Notice: To maintain security, all passwords were reset on 16th July 2014. Please use the "Forgot password?" link on this page to create a new password.

Vogue Smiles Melbourne - Cosmetic & General Dentistry Melbourne

5 1

1 Review

1 Elizabeth Street, 10 Floor Suite 3, Melbourne CBD VIC 3000

  •  Overview 
  •  Photos 
    14
  •  Articles 
    13
  •  FAQ 
    24

Business Overview

We are Friendly, Skilled and Gentle. You would love us!

Read More...

1 Customer Review

,
5
Great job. I appreciate with them because of their great job. All staff is very good and also the infrastructure is also very nice. The nature of the dentist is also very friendly. All kinds of Dental services are provided by them at the reasonable fees. Cosmetic Dental service is too much great. I got my smile back due to them. I thankful to all the staff who is too much friendly with all the patients. I recommend to all those who want to get the best dental services at affordable fees. Thanks and Very best regards, Denture Repairs http://www.parradental.com.au/blog/denturesrepairs-missingteeth

Write a Review

Reviews submitted are subject to the Dentalsurgery.com.au Review Guidelines. Negative reviews may optionally be removed by the business owner, but all ratings (both positive and negative) are used to calculate business rating scores (star ratings).

Recent Activity

22 new articles added to their Articles

Mon 6th Jun

Help in fixing front crooked teeth
Are you unhappy with your bite or the way your teeth look and feel, but can't... read more

Mon 6th Jun

26 new articles added to their Articles

Sun 5th Jun

Phone number updated on their Business Profile Page

Sun 5th Jun

Photo Gallery

View more »

Articles

How to Choose a Cosmetic Dentist - What you need to Know

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Ways to cut on your dental bills

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Nothing personal Doc - 'I Hate Dentists' - The Feel Good Guide to Going to Dentist.

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Bring out your best smile with Porcelain Veneer

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.Bring out your best smile with Porcelain Veneer

Whiter, Straighter and Beautiful Smile in as little as 2-3 visits without metal braces

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

A Million-Dollar Smile (Minus the Million Dollars)

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Teeth Whitening- In House & Take Home Kits. What you need to Know.

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Professional In-Office Teeth Whitening

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Ready for a Life Change? Start with Smile Transformation.

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Look Younger With Cosmetic Dentistry

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Ways to Look Younger with Cosmetic Dentistry

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

How Do You Fix Crooked Front Teeth Without Using Braces

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Make Your Smile Work for You

Vogue Smile Melbourne practices a full scope of general and cosmetic dentistry with unconditional commitment to excellence in delivering quality, warm, personalized dental treatment and care.

Frequently Asked Questions

Dental Jokes

Laugh all you want

A woman and her husband interrupted their vacation to go to the dentist. "I want a tooth pulled, and I don't want Novacaine because I'm in a big hurry," the woman said. "Just extract the tooth as quickly as possible, and we'll be on our way." The dentist was quite impressed. "You're certainly a courageous woman," he said. "Which tooth is it?" The woman turned to her husband and said, "Show him your tooth, dear."

A woman goes to the dentist. When he bows to begin to work, she grabs his balls. The dentist says,
"Madam, I believe you have taken my private zone."
The woman answers, "Yes. We're going to be careful not to hurt each other, aren't we."

Dentists are incapable of asking questions that require a simple yes or no answer.

Did you hear about the dentist who planted a garden?...
A month later he was picking his teeth

What does the dentist of the year get?...A little plaque

What game did the dentist play when she was a child?...Caps and robbers

What does a dentist do on a roller coaster?...He braces himself

What did the dentist see at the North Pole?...A molar bear

What was the dentist doing in Panama?...Looking for the Root Canal

Where does the dentist get his gas?...At the filling station

Why didn't the dentist ask his secretary out?...He was already taking out a tooth

What did the dentist say to the computer?...This won't hurt a byte

Mother: Has your tooth stopped hurting yet?...Son: I don't know. The dentist kept it

What did the tooth say to the departing dentist?...Fill me in when you get back

Anyone know the six most frightening words in the world ??? "The Dentist will see you now."

"Open wider." requested the dentist, as he began his examination of the patient. "Good God !" he said startled. "You've got the biggest cavity I've ever seen - the biggest cavity I've ever seen." "OK Doc !" replied the patient. "I'm scared enough without you saying something like that twice." "I didn't !" said the dentist. "That was the echo."

While I was waiting to see the dentist, a woman came out of his inner office smiling. Nodding to me, she said, "Thank goodness my work is completed. I'm so glad to have found a painless dentist and one who's so gentle and understanding too." When seated in the dentist chair, I related the incident to the doctor. He laughed and explained, "Oh, that was just my Mother."

"I came in to make an appointment with the dentist." said the man to the receptionist." "I'm sorry sir." she replied. "He's out right now, but..." "Thank you." interrupted the obviously nervous prospective patient. "When will he be out again ?"

A patient sits in the dental chair with severely fractured front teeth. After discussing how they will be restored and what the fee would be the patient says, " Before we begin, Doc, I gotta know: Will I be able to play the trumpet when you are finished? "
The dentist replies " Sure you will! "
The patient replies " Great, I couldn't play a note before! "

Patient: Doctor, I am very nervous. You know, this is my first extraction.
Young dentist: Don’t worry, it's my first extraction too.

Dentist: There goes the only woman I ever loved.
Assistant: Why don't you marry her?
Dentist: I can't afford to. She's my best patient.

Dentist: Just let me finish and you will be another man after these cosmetic procedures.
Patient: Okay doc, but don't forget to send your bill to the other man.

When a new dentist set up in a small town he quickly acquired a reputation of being the latest kind of "Painless" dentist. But a local lad quickly disputed this. "He's a fake ! " he told his mates. "He's not painless at all. When he stuck his finger in my mouth I bit him - and he yelled like anyone else."

Dentist to parsimonious patient "No, we give no discount for empty spaces when cleaning and polishing teeth Mrs. Borde!"

Young Charlie to dentist's sexy chariside assistant "Aha ! Are you the lady orthodontist ?".
The lady replied "No, but I'll straighten anyone's teeth "
A guy and a girl met at a bar. They started getting along really well and they decide to go to the girl's place for a drink.
A few drinks later, the guy took off his shirt and washed his hands.
He then took off his socks and washed his hands.
The girl looked at him and said, "You must be a dentist!"
Flabbergasted, the guy responded, "Why yes. That's amazing. How did you determine that?"
The woman replied, "Easy... you keep washing your hands."
Well, one thing led to another, and they migrated to the bed. Things became more and more passionate and... (*snip*)
After their passionate deed was done the woman remarked, "You must be a GREAT dentist!"
The guy was very surprised, and said 'Yes! Yes! I sure am a great dentist... You amaze me! And how did you know THAT, my dear?
' His lover said, "That's easy. I didn't feel a thing."

Stammering Charlie to dentist's sexy secretary: "I have an appointment to get my morals - er molars checked."

Young lady to father "Daddy, when I grow up shall I become a heart-doctor or a tooth-doctor "
"Dentist" "Why father ?" "We have only one heart, but 32 teeth!"

Patient to Dentist: "How much to get my teeth straightened?"
"Twenty thousand bucks" Patient heads for the door.

Dentist to patient: "Where are you going?"
"To a plastic surgeon to get my mouth bent."

A particularly voluptuous lady entered the dentists surgery in an obvious state of agitation. The dentist tried to calm her down assuring her that he would do nothing to hurt her. She sat down in the chair and started fidgeting nervously as the dentist began sterilizing all the required equipment. When he asked her to open her mouth, she screamed.
So he tried to calm her down again even though he was losing patience.
Almost immediately the lady threw a hysterical fit, then realizing that the dentist had begun glaring at her, she said, "Oh doctor, I'm so nervous. I hate dentists. Why, I think I'd rather have a baby than have a tooth drilled."
Replied the dentist " Well Miss, better make up your mind fast so that I can accordingly adjust the chair."

A dinner speaker was in such a hurry to get to the hotel that when he arrived and sat down at the head table, he suddenly realized that he had forgotten to get his false teeth. Turning to the man next to him he said, "I forgot my teeth." The man said, "No problem." With that he reached into his pocket and pulled out a pair of false teeth. "Try these," he said. The speaker tried them. "Too loose," he said. The man then said, "I have another pair...try these." The speaker tried them and responded, "Too tight." The man was not taken back at all. He then said, "I have one more pair...try them." The speaker said, "They fit perfectly." With that he ate his meal and gave his address. After the dinner meeting was over, the speaker went over to thank the man who had helped him. "I want to thank you for coming to my aid. Where is your office? I've been looking for a good dentist." The man replied, "I'm not a dentist. I'm the local undertaker."

A guy goes to visit his grandmother and he brings his friend with him. While he's talking to his grandmother, his friend starts eating the peanuts on the coffee table, and finishes them off.
As they're leaving, his friend says to his grandmother, "Thanks for the peanuts." She says, "Yeah, since I lost my dentures I can only suck the chocolate off 'em."

Patient: How much to have this tooth pulled?
Dentist: With pain $200 and without pain $100.
Patient: Well, without pain it's cheaper. Pull it WITHOUT pain.
Without anesthesia neither anything, the dentist begins to extract the tooth, when the patient outcry: Aaaahhhhhhhh !!!!!
Hey, WITH pain it costs $200 !!!, replies the dentist.

Patient: How much to have this tooth pulled?
Dentist: $200
Patient: $200 for just a few minutes work???
Dentist: I can extract it very slowly, if you like.

What's worse than having your doctor tell you that you have VD?
Having your dentist tell you.

Dentist says to the patient: Could you help me? Could you give out a few of your loudest, most painful screams?
Patient: Why? Doc, it isn't all that bad this time.
Dentist: There are so many people in the waiting room right now and I don't want to miss the 4 o'clock cricket day-night game.

Patient: Doctor, I have yellow teeth, what do I do?
Dentist: Wear a brown tie...

A patient asked the dentist, if it wasn’t nasty to be all the day with the hands in someone's mouth.
The dentist answered "I just think of it as having my hands in their wallet."

Filling Materials used in General Dentistry

Types of Dental Restorations or Filling materials: Dental Filling ChoicesThere are two types of dental restorations: direct and indirect.

Direct restorations are fillings placed immediately into a prepared cavity in a single visit. They include dental amalgam, glass ionomers, resin ionomers and some resin composite fillings. The dentist prepares the tooth, places the filling and adjusts it during one appointment.

Indirect restorations generally require two or more visits. They include inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns and bridges fabricated with gold, base metal alloys, ceramics or composites. During the first visit, the dentist prepares the tooth and makes an impression of the area to be restored. The impression is sent to a dental laboratory, which creates the dental restoration. At the next appointment, the dentist cements the restoration into the prepared cavity and adjusts it as needed.

DIRECT RESTORATIONS

1.Amalgam Fillings

Used by dentists for more than a century, dental amalgam is the most thoroughly researched and tested restorative material among all those in use. It is durable, easy to use, highly resistant to wear and relatively inexpensive in comparison to other materials. For those reasons, it remains a valued treatment option for dentists and their patients.

Dental amalgam is a stable alloy made by combining elemental mercury, silver, tin, copper and possibly other metallic elements. Although dental amalgam continues to be a safe, commonly used restorative material, some concern has been raised because of its mercury content. However, the mercury in amalgam combines with other metals to render it stable and safe for use in filling teeth.

While questions have arisen about the safety of dental amalgam relating to its mercury content, the major U.S. and international scientific and health bodies, including the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and the World Health Organization, among others have been satisfied that dental amalgam is a safe, reliable and effective restorative material.

Because amalgam fillings can withstand very high chewing loads, they are particularly useful for restoring molars in the back of the mouth where chewing load is greatest. They are also useful in areas where a cavity preparation is difficult to keep dry during the filling replacement, such as in deep fillings below the gum line. Amalgam fillings, like other filling materials, are considered biocompatible-they are well tolerated by patients with only rare occurrences of allergic response.

Disadvantages of amalgam include possible short-term sensitivity to hot or cold after the filling is placed. The silver-colored filling is not as natural looking as one that is tooth-colored, especially when the restoration is near the front of the mouth, and shows when the patient laughs or speaks. And to prepare the tooth, the dentist may need to remove more tooth structure to accommodate an amalgam filling than for other types of fillings.


2. Composite Fillings

Composite fillings are a mixture of glass or quartz filler in a resin medium that produces a tooth-colored filling. They are sometimes referred to as composites or filled resins. Composite fillings provide good durability and resistance to fracture in small-to-mid size restorations that need to withstand moderate chewing pressure. Less tooth structure is removed when the dentist prepares the tooth, and this may result in a smaller filling than that of an amalgam. Composites can also be "bonded" or adhesively held in a cavity, often allowing the dentist to make a more conservative repair to the tooth.

The cost is moderate and depends on the size of the filling and the technique used by the dentist to place it in the prepared tooth. It generally takes longer to place a composite filling than what is required for an amalgam filling. Composite fillings require a cavity that can be kept clean and dry during filling and they are subject to stain and discoloration over time.

3. Glass ionomers

Glass ionomers are translucent, tooth-colored materials made of a mixture of acrylic acids and fine glass powders that are used to fill cavities, particularly those on the root surfaces of teeth. Glass ionomers can release a small amount of fluoride that may be beneficial for patients who are at high risk for decay. When the dentist prepares the tooth for a glass ionomer, less tooth structure can be removed; this may result in a smaller filling than that of an amalgam

Glass ionomers are primarily used in areas not subject to heavy chewing pressure. Because they have a low resistance to fracture, glass ionomers are mostly used in small non-load bearing fillings (those between the teeth) or on the roots of teeth.

Resin ionomers also are made from glass filler with acrylic acids and acrylic resin. They also are used for very small, non-load bearing fillings (between the teeth), on the root surfaces of teeth, and they have low to moderate resistance to fracture.

Ionomers experience high wear when placed on chewing surfaces. Both glass and resin ionomers mimic natural tooth color but lack the natural translucency of enamel. Both types are well tolerated by patients with only rare occurrences of allergic response.


-back to top-

INDIRECT RESTORATIONS:

Indirect Restorative Dental Materials (Two or more visits)

Sometimes the best dental treatment for a tooth is to use a restoration that is made in a laboratory from a mold. These custom-made restorations, which require two or more visits, can be a crown, an inlay or an onlay. A crown covers the entire chewing surface and sides of the tooth. An inlay is smaller and fits within the contours of the tooth.

An onlay is similar to an inlay, but it is larger and covers some or all chewing surfaces of the tooth. The cost of indirect restorations is generally higher due to the number and length of visits required, and the additional cost of having the restoration made in a dental laboratory. Materials used to fabricate these restorations are porcelain (ceramic), porcelain fused to a metal-supporting structure, gold alloys and base metal alloys.

All-Porcelain (Ceramic) Dental Materials

All-porcelain (ceramic) dental materials include porcelain, ceramic or glasslike fillings and crowns. They are used as inlays, onlays, crowns and aesthetic veneers. A veneer is a very thin shell of porcelain that can replace or cover part of the enamel of the tooth. All-porcelain (ceramic) restorations are particularly desirable because their color and translucency mimic natural tooth enamel.

All-porcelain restorations require a minimum of two visits and possibly more. The restorations are prone to fracture when placed under tension or on impact. The strength of this type of restoration depends on an adequate thickness of porcelain and the ability to be bonded to the underlying tooth. They are highly resistant to wear but the porcelain can quickly wear opposing teeth if the porcelain surface becomes rough

Gold Alloys

Gold alloys contain gold, copper and other metals that result in a strong, effective filling, crown or a bridge. They are primarily used for inlays, onlays, crowns and fixed bridges. They are highly resistant to corrosion and tarnishing.
Gold alloys exhibit high strength and toughness that resists fracture and wear. This allows the dentist to remove the least amount of healthy tooth structure when preparing the tooth for the restoration. Gold alloys are also gentle to opposing teeth and are well tolerated by patients. However, their metal colors do not look like natural teeth.

Base Metal Alloys

Base metal alloys are non-noble metals with a silver appearance. They are used in crowns, fixed bridges and partial dentures. They can be resistant to corrosion and tarnishing. They also have high strength and toughness and are very resistant to fracture and wear.

Some patients may show allergic sensitivity to base metals and there may be some initial discomfort from hot and cold. However, due to their metal color, gold alloys do not look like natural teeth.

Indirect Composites

Crowns, inlays and onlays can be made in the laboratory from dental composites. These materials are similar to those used in direct fillings and are tooth colored. One advantage to indirect composites is that they do not excessively wear opposing teeth. Their strength and durability is not as high as porcelain or metal restorations and they are more prone to wear and discoloration.

What's Right for Me?

Several factors influence the performance, durability, longevity and cost of dental restorations. These factors include: the patient's oral and general health, the components used in the filling material; where and how the filling is placed; the chewing load that the tooth will have to bear; and the length and number of visits needed to prepare and adjust the restored tooth.

With so many choices, how do you know what's right for you? To help you better understand what's available, here are the advantages and disadvantages of commonly used dental restorations.
The ultimate decision about what to use is best determined by the patient in consultation with the dentist. Before your treatment begins, discuss the options with your dentist.

-back to top-

Benefits of Tooth-Colored Fillings

Tooth-colored fillings are easy to apply. In just one appointment, our dentists can give you durable, beautiful restorations that will last for many years.

Tooth-colored fillings are ideal for patients who have a metal sensitivity, are concerned about the mercury content of amalgam fillings, or who simply want to preserve their beautiful smile. Today's technology allows for a tenacious, long-lasting bond between the restoration and the tooth. We can even replace old metal fillings - which are always at risk for cracking and discoloring - with tooth-colored restorations. You'll love your new smile and wonder how you ever put up with unsightly metal fillings!

An increasingly common general dentistry solution, tooth-colored fillings are a great way to preserve the beauty of their smile while boosting the health and strength of their teeth.

Bonding Procedure with White Fillings

A bonding is a composite resin that is used as an alternative to amalgams and veneers. This is an excellent cosmetic option for those patients who do not want the look of silver in their mouths and do not want the expense of veneers. Bondings can be used on teeth that are decayed, cracked, or stained.

Procedure

The bonding procedure is usually completed in one visit. The first step is to remove the decayed or unsightly portion of the tooth. The tooth is then etched with a liquid or gel and a bonding agent is then applied. This will allow the composite resin to be placed in the prepared tooth. The resin is then trimmed and polished, leaving you with a beautifully sculpted, natural-looking restoration.

Bonding Durability

Although composite resins are cosmetically pleasing and easily placed, their durability is not as strong as other types of restorations. These resins typically last from 4-7 years before they begin to chip and wear away. When this happens, the restoration will need to be replaced.

-back to top-

What are Inlays/Onlays?

Inlays and onlays are sometimes referred to as partial crowns. These partial crowns are utilized when there is still a healthy enamel portion of the tooth. An inlay or onlay is a like a puzzle piece that will be fitted into the remaining portion of the tooth to help increase its strength. This piece is usually crafted out of porcelain or gold, but can also be made of a composite material. We will make the determination as to which restoration will work best in your specific situation.

An inlay is used when there is not damage to any of the cusps of your tooth and is essentially place within these cusps. An onlay is used when there is slightly more extensive damage to the tooth structure. This type of restoration is placed over at least one of the cusps on the tooth.

Procedure

When we have decided to go ahead with an inlay or onlay, we will set aside 2-3 appointments for the entire process. Although the majority of inlays and onlays are completed in two visits, there is sometimes a need for a third visit to ensure a proper fit.

The procedure begins with the removal of all decay in the tooth. Once we have removed the decay, we will take an impression of the tooth. This impression will be sent to our lab where your new restoration will be crafted. While this new tooth is created, we will provide you with a temporary restoration. Our temporary restorations will resemble your natural teeth so that you can continue with your daily life without worrying about a missing or incompatible tooth.

During your second visit to the office, we will proceed with the placement of your final restoration. The inlay/onlay will be fitted comfortably into the mouth. We will make every effort to ensure that the new restoration feels exactly like one of your natural teeth. The final step in the process is to cement the inlay/onlay into your mouth, leaving you with a beautifully restored smile.

Postoperative Care After any Fillings

Procedure

When an anesthetic has been used, your lips and tongue may be numb for several hours after the appointment. Avoid any chewing and hot beverages until the numbness has completely worn off. It is very easy to bite or burn your tongue or lip while you are numb.

It is normal to experience some hot, cold & pressure sensitivity after your appointment. Injection sites may also be sore. Ibuprofen (Motrin), Tylenol or aspirin (two tablets every 4-6 hours as needed for pain) work well to alleviate the tenderness. If pressure sensitivity persists beyond a few days or if the sensitivity to hot or cold increases, contact our office.

You may chew with your composite fillings as soon as the anesthetic completely wears off, since they are fully set when you leave the office.

-back to top-

Dental sealants

Sealants are clear or white plastic coatings that stick or bond to the surfaces of teeth. They are used to cover particular teeth to help prevent tooth decay. Sealants do not dissolve in saliva and are safe. They were developed in the 1960s and have been widely used since this time.

Sealants block the physical effects of early tooth decay

A combination of sealants (on teeth) and fluoride (in water or toothpaste) will virtually eliminate decay in the permanent teeth of many children. In children:

  • Fluoride in the water supply and toothpaste, and the School Dental Program, have reduced tooth decay in children.

  • Decay is now much less common, although preventable decay still occurs.

  • Most decay starts as narrow pits and grooves on the biting surfaces of teeth in the back of the mouth, these narrow grooves are too small for the thick bristles of toothbrushes to get in to clean.

  • Germs from plaque living in the grooves can make acid, which may causes tooth decay.

Sealants fill up the grooves

Sealants painlessly fill and block up grooves that are too small for the toothbrush to clean.
Sealants:

  • Are applied by a dentist or dental therapist

  • Fill and block up the small pits and grooves in the teeth to prevent decay

  • Take a few minutes to apply to the teeth

  • Are painless

  • Do not require injections

  • Do not require drilling.

  • Can last from two to seven years, but may last up to 15 years.

  • Your dentist or dental hygienist should check sealants regularly

How sealants are put on teeth

To apply sealants, the dental care provider will:

  • Prepare teeth - clean and dry the tooth or teeth

  • Apply sealant - a thin layer of plastic liquid into the groove or pit, just like how nail polish is painted onto a fingernail.

  • Placed on permanent teeth - in the back of the mouth those have the highest risk of tooth decay. In most children, the first permanent molars appear about age six or seven years and the second molars about age 11 or 12 years.

The liquid then hardens into a tough layer that prevents decay occurring.

-back to top-

Crown Lengthening

When decay occurs below the gumline, it may be necessary to remove a small amount of bone and gum tissue. Your dentist may ask for this procedure before he or she makes a new crown for your tooth.

Crown Lengthening procedures are done for both restorative dentistry and/or to improve the esthetics of your gum line. General practitioners often refer for crown lengthening procedures prior to restoration of broken or severely decayed teeth. This procedure adjusts the gum and bone level to expose more of the tooth so it can be restored.

Sometimes crown lengthening is done to improve a "gummy" smile because the teeth appear short. The teeth may actually be the proper length but excess gum tissue may be covering these teeth. During this procedure, excess gum and bone tissue is reshaped to expose more of the natural tooth

Dental Bridges

A bridge is one of the few options that you have when deciding how to deal with a missing tooth or teeth. The replacement of these missing teeth is necessary in order to maintain the proper mouth functions. Tooth loss can affect the way you eat, speak, and the alignment of other teeth in your mouth.

Types of Bridges

A bridge, by definition, is a link or connection between two permanent structures. A dental bridge is very similar in that it attaches the restorative teeth (bridge) to the natural teeth on either side of the gap. This bridge acts as your new teeth, closing the gap and restoring your smile. Bridges are often constructed of gold or metal foundations with porcelain fused to the foundation. This ensures that the bridge will support the normal functions of the mouth.

There are three main types of bridges:

  • Traditional bridges involve creating a crown for the tooth or implant on either side of the missing tooth, with a pontic in between. Traditional bridges are the most common type of bridge and are made of either porcelain fused to metal or ceramics.

  • Cantilever bridges are used when there are adjacent teeth on only one side of the missing tooth or teeth.

  • Maryland bonded bridges (also called a resin-bonded bridge or a Maryland bridge) are made of porcelain teeth and gums supported by a metal framework. Metal wings on each side of the bridge are bonded to your existing teeth.

Procedure

The procedure begins with preparation of the natural teeth, or abutments. We will shape the abutment teeth so that the ends of the bridge will fit comfortably on each one. The next step is to take an impression of the area. This impression will be sent to our lab where your new restoration will be crafted. While this new tooth is created, we will provide you with a temporary restoration. Our temporary restorations will resemble your natural teeth so that you can continue with your daily life without worrying about a missing or unattractive tooth.

During your second visit to the office, we will proceed with the placement of your final restoration. This bridge will be fitted comfortably into the mouth. We will make every effort to ensure that the new bridge feels exactly like your natural teeth. The final step in the process is to cement the bridge into your mouth, leaving you with a beautifully restored smile.

Dental Crowns or Caps

As we get a little older, our teeth begin to change and are prone to decay. There are many possible reasons for this change in your smile. These reasons can include bruxism(teeth grinding), general decay, cracked fillings, root canals, and many others. If your tooth is beyond repair with a filling material, we may recommend that the best viable option to save the tooth is a full crown. The reasons for this type of restoration in a badly damaged tooth are durability, cosmetic appearance, and overall support of the chewing function.

Types of Crowns

If we decide that you are in need of a full crown, there are a few different options for the repair of your tooth. These options include a full porcelain crown, a porcelain fused to metal or gold crown, or a full gold crown. We will make the determination as to which of these options is the most appropriate for your situation. You can be comfortable in knowing that your new tooth will be virtually unnoticeable and will flawlessly complement the rest of your smile.

Procedure
When we have decided to go ahead with a full crown restoration, we will set aside 2-3 appointments for the entire process. Although the majority of crowns are completed in two visits, there is sometimes a need for a third visit to ensure a proper fit.

The procedure begins with the removal of all decay in the tooth. Once we have removed the decay, we will take an impression of the tooth. This impression will be sent to our lab where your new restoration will be crafted. While this new tooth is created, we will provide you with a temporary restoration. Our temporary restorations will resemble your natural teeth so that you can continue with your daily life without worrying about a missing or incompatible tooth.

During your second visit to the office, we will proceed with the placement of your final restoration. This crown will be fitted comfortably into the mouth. We will make every effort to ensure that the new tooth feels exactly like one of your natural teeth. The final step in the process is to cement the crown into your mouth, leaving you with a beautifully restored smile.

Postoperative care After crown and bridge appointments

Crowns and bridges usually take two or three appointments to complete. In the first visit, the teeth are prepared and molds of the mouth are taken. Temporary crowns or bridges are placed to protect the teeth while the custom restoration is being made. Since the teeth will be anesthetized, the tongue, lips and roof of the mouth may be numb. Please refrain from eating and drinking hot beverages until the numbness is completely worn off.

Occasionally a temporary crown may come off. Call us if this happens and bring the temporary crown with you so we can re-cement it. It is very important for the temporary to stay in place, as it will prevent other teeth from moving and compromising the fit of your final restoration.

To keep your temporaries in place, avoid eating sticky foods (gum), hard foods, and if possible, chew on the opposite side of your mouth. It is important to brush normally, but floss carefully and don't pull up on the floss which may dislodge the temporary but pull the floss out from the side of the temporary crown.

It is normal to experience some temperature and pressure sensitivity after each appointment. The sensitivity should subside a few weeks after the placement of the final restoration. Mild pain medications may also be used as directed by our office.

Unhappy with any aspect of your smile - How about Smile makeover?

Smile Makeover with Cosmetic Dentistry
Services Offered at the Melbourne Center for Cosmetic Dentistry


Ideally we would all love to have the most amazing smile, but this is not an ideal world and most of us are not blessed with good smile or great teeth. Looking good is very important in this competitive world and these days people can go to great lengths to look perfect. Smile is one of the most important elements for an individual to look beautiful and charming

Let's face it; your smile is the first thing people notice. If you have white, straight teeth and healthy gums, you exude confidence and youth. Alternately, if your teeth are stained, chipped, or uneven, this detracts from appearance and can make you feel self-conscious when speaking with others. Many of our clients have come in asking for help with their smiles. We are pleased to say that in all cases, we have been able to turn troubled smiles into bright smiles with the latest in cosmetic dentistry.

There is no reason for you to walk through life feeling bad about your smile. At Preferred Dental Care in Melbourne, we strives for perfection when working with a patient. We are not happy unless you are happy; therefore, we work hard to produce the best results. We are passionate in creating a Beautiful Smile Transformation and we are confident that we can make a positive difference in the way your teeth and smile.

Take a moment to browse through our website and become better educated about the cosmetic dentistry procedures available to you. It is our intention that you find our website very informative, relevant and helpful in your search for a dedicated professional who will help you achieve your dream smile. Please view our photo gallery and gain a better idea of how these procedures can help enhance your smile.

If you are unhappy with any aspect of your smile, please call us for your complimentary smile makeover consultation. We will discuss with you what can be done to improve any aspect of your smile that concerns you.


Using the many procedures of Cosmetic Dentistry, we can correct smile problems you may have, including:

  • Close gaps between your teeth,

  • Repair chipped, worn or broken teeth,

  • Change tooth size, shape, color, length and width,

  • Replace missing teeth,

  • Whiten stained, discolored teeth,

  • Replace unattractive, failing silver-mercury fillings strong, safe, attractive tooth-colored restorations,

  • Recontour gums to reduce the appearance of a “gummy” smile.

We are pleased to offer a full range of cosmetic and restorative dental services to our patients. Please find below a quick summary of the few of the Cosmetic Smile Makeover Treatment that we provide. If you are seriously considering any procedures for yourself, we invite you to read the detailed information of each treatment you are considering on our succeeding web pages, so you would be better informed.
Extreme Smile Makeover

Sometimes referred to as "immediate or Insant orthodontics," extreme smile makeovers can give provide a beautiful, brand-new image. At our office, porcelain veneers and crowns, are some of the few to help patients achieve their dream smiles. We can whiten, lengthen, and even straighten teeth. No matter what your concerns are (chips, gaps, stains, mild crookedness), we strive can create a stunning new smile for you.

Teeth Whitening with ZOOM, Laserbrite and Tooth Bleaching

Almost everyone would like to have whiter teeth. For fast and dazzling results, consider having your teeth whitened in our office. In about over an hour, we can make your smile several shades whiter. If you would prefer to do your teeth whitening at home, we can help you achieve professional results over a few short weeks. It's simple and quick, so please schedule your appointment with us today.

Dental Porcelain Veneers

Perhaps the most versatile of all cosmetic dentistry procedures, porcelain veneers can fix a wide variety of problems. They can be used to cover chips and stains. Dental veneers are also used to change the shape, length, alignment or overall color of your teeth. Porcelain veneers are custom-made for you. Essentially, they are thin sheets of natural-looking porcelain that can be laid over your teeth to mask problems and create beauty. The smile you've always dreamed of can be yours in as little as two appointments with porcelain veneers.

All-Porcelain Crowns

When cavities or decay affect a large portion of the tooth, a filling may not be possible. Instead, you may need to get dental crowns at. Crowns used to be known as "caps" and were easily given away by a dark line along the gums. New porcelain crowns match the colour of your teeth and eliminate the telltale line. The result is renewed tooth strength and natural-looking beauty.

Dental Teeth/Tooth Bonding Procedure

When it comes to reshaping teeth or correcting minor flaws, cosmetic bonding is a simple and affordable option for many patients. Cosmetic bonding involves placing a tooth-coloured resin on your teeth to alter their shape or fix problems. Your natural teeth do not need to be removed for bonding. It's an easy way to improve the appearance of your smile.

Metal/Mercury Free Tooth-Colored White Fillings with Composite and Porcelain Restorations

Metal fillings are quickly becoming a thing of the past. These fillings, made of a material called "dental amalgam" leave a big, unsightly blotch of silver right in the middle of your tooth. Now, we use a composite resin or much better is a Porcelain inlay or onlay, that is shaded to perfectly matched to the colour of your tooth. Tooth-coloured fillings are just as strong and durable as old dental amalgam fillings, and are much less conspicuous. We are even able to remove old, ugly metal fillings and replace them with tooth-coloured ones.

What Is Invisalign?

Is your smile holding you back? Research shows that people who smile more are more likely to be successful across many life domains than people who smile less. Having straight, healthy teeth can give you the confidence you need to show the world a big beautiful smile. And, a beautiful new smile may help open the doors to a fabulous new job, a relationship or simply a pleasant meeting. If you feel your smile is holding you back, maybe it’s time to look at what Invisalign can do for you?

What Is Invisalign?

Invisalign is the nearly invisible way to straighten your teeth without braces. Using space-age computer CAD-CAM technology, Invisalign creates a series of clear, comfortable aligners (pictured to the right) that gently and quickly straighten your teeth without metal wires or brackets. Over the past 5 years, Invisalign has proven to be an extremely effective and efficient way to help adults achieve the straight, beautiful smile they’ve always wanted.

How Does Invisalign Work?

You wear each set of computer-generated comfortable aligners for about 2 weeks, removing them for meals and to brush. To get the best results, you’ll want to wear your aligners about 20-22 hours/day.

Side Benefit - Many of our patients have reported a 5-7 lb. weight loss as the result of decreased snacking throughout the day. About every 2 weeks you will switch to the next aligner in the series, as your teeth are gently moved towards the final position. You normally will come to the office for a check up and to pick up your next set of aligners about every 4-6 weeks, making this convenient for most patients’ busy schedule. Total treatment time will vary based on your teeth, but on average Invisalign treatment is 30-40% faster than traditional braces and best of all, it’s nearly invisible. Most patients time of treatment averages between 6-14 months. Some are quicker, some may be slightly longer.

TREATMENT PROCESS

• Talking to an Invisalign Provider Your treatment begins after you select the experienced Invisalign Preferred Provider that you feel most comfortable with and schedule your initial consultation. Because you will be interacting with this doctor on a regular basis, you may even want to personally meet with a few providers in order to find one that is exactly right for you. This is an important medical and financial decision - that's why choosing the right doctor and the right treatment plan is so essential. Keep in mind that not all dentists and orthodontists work with Invisalign, so it's important to find a doctor who has received the proper Invisalign training and can truly evaluate your needs and determine how Invisalign can help you.

During the consultation, you and your doctor will discuss your case in detail to determine if you're a good candidate for Invisalign. Invisalign now addresses many cases, from simple to more complex. Your doctor will determine if Invisalign is right for you. (Take the Self Assessment ahead of time to see if you might be a good candidate.) This will also be your opportunity to ask any questions you have about the treatment: costs, dental/orthodontic insurance, or any other concerns. See which doctors in your area are Invisalign Providers.

• Getting Started
Your doctor will take x-rays, pictures and impressions of your teeth, which Invisalign will use to create a digital 3-D image of them. From these images your doctor will map out a precise treatment plan, including the exact movements of your teeth. Using this same technology, your doctor will even be able to show you a virtual representation of how your teeth will move with each stage of treatment.

3.Getting Your Personal Custom Aligners Based on your individual treatment plan, a series of custom-made, clear aligners are then created specifically for you. These aligners are made of a smooth, comfortable BPA-free plastic that won't irritate your cheeks and gums like traditional metal braces often do. Simply wear them throughout the day, and remove them when you eat or to brush and floss your teeth. As you wear each set of aligners, your teeth gently and gradually begin to shift into place. And because they're virtually invisible, most people won't even notice you're wearing them.

• A Simple Process—With Only Occasional Checkups

Approximately every two weeks, you will begin wearing a new set of aligners, advancing you to the next stage of your treatment. To monitor your progress, you will also have occasional checkups with your doctor, usually only every six weeks or so. At every stage, you will be able to see how much closer you are to having the smile that reflects the real you.

• Length of Time Until You Reveal Your New Smile

While every case is unique to each patient, treatment typically takes approximately a year for adults. For teens, the length of treatment is comparable to that of braces, but since your teeth won't be covered by wires and brackets, you'll be able to see improvement much sooner. For best results and a timely outcome, you should wear your aligners for 20 to 22 hours per day, throughout your entire treatment.

Treatable Cases

Many people believe that Invisalign is only effective at treating minor orthodontic issues. But the fact is that our 96% patient satisfaction rate is a result of successfully treating a broad range of cases, from overly crowded teeth and underbites to jaw problems and tooth misalignment.

We’re also continually making new advancements in our products and treatment process for even better clinical results. Most recently, the addition of Precision Cuts allows our aligners to now accommodate the use of elastics. As a result, more severe bite issues can be corrected effectively with Invisalign.

Not everyone is a candidate for Invisalign, but luckily about 80% of adults can benefit from it. Here are some of the common conditions currently treated with Invisalign; if there is a specific issue that you do not see addressed here, please contact us to see if Invisalign is right for you.

SPACED TEETH

This occurs with abnormal continued growth of the jaw bone. When teeth are missing, this can also be caused by the surrounding teeth shifting due to extra space. Spacing issues between teeth can lead to gum problems (due to lack of protection by the teeth), periodontal pockets and increased risk of periodontal disease.

OVERLY CROWDED TEETH

This occurs when there is simply a lack of room within your jaw for all of your teeth to fit normally. When left untreated, overly crowded teeth can get worse over time. This crowding can lead to plaque accumulation, tooth decay and an increased chance of gum disease.

CROSSBITE

This occurs when the upper and lower jaws are both misaligned. It causes one or more upper teeth to bite on the inside of the lower teeth, and can happen on both the front and the sides of the mouth. This can lead to abnormal tooth wear and chipping, and periodontal problems including gum disease and bone loss.

UNDERBITE

This occurs when the lower teeth protrude past the front teeth. It’s usually caused by undergrowth of the upper jaw, overgrowth of the lower jaw, or both. It can also be caused by missing upper teeth. This can prevent the normal function of front teeth or molars, which can lead to tooth wear. It can also cause painful jaw and joint problems.

OVERBITE

What people commonly refer to as an "overbite" is known to dental professionals as "overjet". It occurs when the upper teeth bite over the lower teeth. It’s typically caused by genetics, bad oral habits, or overdevelopment of the bone that supports the teeth. This can lead to gum disease and chipped or fractured front teeth.

Will Invisalign® work for me?

Invisalign® can be used to successfully treat a wide range of problems, including crooked, crowded or spaced teeth. Sometimes even more complex cases – such as overbites, under-bites, and even cross-bites – can be treated. To ascertain your suitability for orthodontic treatment with Invisalign®, a consultation appointment with one of our orthodontists is necessary. In cases where Invisalign® is not suitable due to the complexity of the bite, a person seeking a cosmetic orthodontic option can explore internal lingual braces.

Is the Invisalign® treatment painful?

Some people may experience minor discomfort at the beginning of each new stage of treatment when they insert a new aligner. This is normal and is typically described as a feeling of pressure. It is a sign that the aligners are working – moving your teeth gradually and thus helping you to achieve the final results. This discomfort typically goes away in a couple of days.

Are there restrictions on what I can eat while in treatment?

No. Unlike traditional wires and brackets, you can eat whatever you like while in treatment because you remove your aligners to eat and drink. There is no need to restrict consuming any of your favourite foods and snacks. It is important that you brush and floss your teeth after each meal and before reinserting your aligners to maintain proper hygiene.

How often must the aligners be worn?

Aligners should be worn all the time during treatment, except when eating or when brushing or flossing your teeth.

Will the aligners affect my speech?

The vast majority of patients report no effect on speech. However, as with traditional orthodontic appliances, there is an initial adjustment period associated with having something new in your mouth.

Chewing gum while wearing your aligners is not advised as gum can stick to the aligners. It is recommended that aligners be removed for all meals and snacks.

How much does Invisalign® cost?

As with other types of orthodontic treatment, the cost of Invisalign® is dependent on the complexity of your case and your course of treatment. The cost of your treatment will be determined following a consultation with one of our orthodontists. Please call us to arrange your consultation appointment.

THE ADVANTAGE OVER BRACES

While the end results may appear the same—a confident, beautiful smile—when you stop and actually compare Invisalign to other teeth-straightening options, the advantages become quite apparent. Knowing the pros and cons of each option ahead of time will help you make a more confident decision.

*Effectively treats a wide variety of cases, including crowding, spacing, crossbite, overbite and underbite.
*Allows you to eat whatever foods you enjoy.
*Lets you remove the device when you want.
*Lets you enjoy virtually invisible teeth-straightening.
*Allows you to brush and floss your teeth normally for better periodontal health.
*Consists of smooth, comfortable plastic instead of sharp metal that is more likely to irritate your cheeks and gums.
*Frees up your busy schedule, with office visits only every four to six weeks.

With regular braces, you may experience some or all of the following: pain, discomfort, mouth sores or injuries caused by the brace wires, tooth decay (from inadequate brushing and flossing), plaque buildup, tooth discoloration, tooth/bracket breakage, or difficulty eating. As if that weren’t enough, there are also the personal sacrifices - popcorn, chips, bagels, hard-crusted bread, pizza crust, pretzel, nuts, certain candies…plus apples, carrots, corn on the cob, and more.

THE ADVANTAGE OVER VENEER

Many patients have asked about the benefits of veneers when compared to Invisalign. While veneers are certainly an option for improving your smile, they only cover up certain dental imperfections, rather than correct them. This means that some existing periodontal problems could still remain. Applied to the front side of the teeth only, veneers also require the removal of the surface enamel of each tooth - an irreversible procedure. Often considered a quick fix, veneers typically need to be replaced. Heavy coffee, tea and red wine need to be avoided to prevent discoloration, and care must be taken to prevent chipping or breaking the veneer. If the veneer chipped, it need to be repaired. So while the surface look of the teeth may improve with veneers, the underlying tooth and gum problems could still exist. Main advantage of Invisalign over Veneer is the not having the biological cost especially removing a healthy tooth structure.

Of course, there’s always the option of not seeking treatment at all. Ultimately, the choice is yours, but do keep in mind that, if left untreated, many orthodontic issues can often lead to more serious dental and health issues. Click here to learn more about the health benefits of straighter teeth and a proper bite.

For more information click on this link http://www.invisalign.com/ or http://zc1330.dposite.com

LUMINEER VENEER The gentle alternative to Traditional Porcelain Veneers, Braces & permanent Teeth whitening

LUMINEERS® Porcelain Veneers

Have you avoided having a smile makeover with porcelain veneers because you are anxious about the placement process? If so, LUMINEERS® may be right for you, since placing them does not require removing the tooth's enamel.

Lumineers are porcelain veneers that offer the painless way to a permanently whiter and perfectly aligned smile. LUMINEERS BY CERINATE is a terrific cosmetic solution for permanently stained, chipped, discolored, misaligned teeth, or even to revitalize old existing crown and bridgework without having to replace them.
. We can apply these contact lens-thin "smile shapers" to teeth without any grinding or shaving, transforming teeth into a naturally beautiful smile that looks perfect for every individual.

Benefits of LUMINEERS® Porcelain Veneers

  • Virtually painless placement process. Since LUMINEERS® are about the size of a contact lens, no tooth reduction is needed to prepare the tooth in most cases

  • Convenient, two-visit placement. Your cosmetic dentist Melbourne can place LUMINEERS® in 2-5 office visits: one to plan your new smile, and one to place the veneers.

  • Reduced risk of tooth sensitivity and trauma. Since the tooth's enamel is not removed, there is less of a risk of tooth sensitivity or injury.

  • Reversibility. Unlike traditional veneers placement, LUMINEERS® can be removed in the future.

  • Extraordinarily strong. Clinically proven to last up to 16-20 years

  • A viable alternative to braces in many cases

  • No temporaries required

  • Evolving from Cerinate porcelain restorations, lauded as one of the top 100 dental products for 2002 by Dentistry Today, a highly-respected publication

LUMINEERS can only be made from patented Cerinate porcelain unavailable anywhere other than the Cerinate Smile Design Studio. In just 2-5 visits you can have a custom-made smile that is clinically proven to last over 20 years - and it is completely reversible since your natural tooth structure is still intact

FAQ's

What makes LUMINEERS® Porcelain Veneers different from other veneers?

LUMINEERS are a brand of porcelain veneers by Cerinate that are made of the ceramic material and glued to the surface of your teeth, just like porcelain veneers. However, lumineers are thinner, contact lens-thin and are placed over existing teeth without having to remove sensitive or painful tooth structure. LUMINEERS is thus painless because they don't require removal of painful tooth structure , permanent cosmetic solution for stained, chipped, discolored or misaligned teeth.

What are the indications of Lumineer Veneer?

  • Whiten stained teeth

  • Reshape misaligned/crooked teeth

  • Even out uneven teeth

  • Lenghten short teeth

  • Close spaces or gaps in between teeth

  • Revitalize old crown and bridgework

  • Fix chipped teeth

Is the LUMINEERS procedure painful?

Getting ultra-thin veneers is one of the least invasive dental procedures available. LUMINEERS procedure is a pain-free way to reshape and permanently whiten your teeth. Because they are so thin, in most cases you will get a perfect fit without shots or grinding down of the original tooth structure. Also once the Lumineers have been placed, there is no discomfort or sensitivity later on.

I think I need braces, but I heard sometimes teeth can be fixed with LUMINEERS?

In most cases, yes! Your dentist will be able to evaluate your dental situation and decide whether braces are needed. Sometimes, if you do not have severely mis-aligned teeth, LUMINEERS can be used to reshape your teeth, making them look straighter and more uniform, as well as whiter, something you don't get with braces.

How long do the LUMINEERS last for?

Long term clinical research and testing has proven that your new LUMINEERS smile will last and look great for over 20 years.

How long does it take to get LUMINEERS?

The whole process takes only 2-5 visits and on your second visit when the Lumineers are placed, you can expect to be complete in an hour or so.

What gets done with a LUMINEERS procedure?

After a comprehensive exam, we will develop a comprehensive cosmetic treatment plan to make your smile exactly the way you want. On the first visit, we will create a precise mold of your teeth. Then we will send everything to the LUMINEERS Smile Design Studio for your custom LUMINEERS to be created. With LUMINEERS, there are no temporaries. Then when you are in our dental practice for your second visit, your LUMINEERS are painlessly applied without shots or drilling of sensitive tooth structure.

To see what your smile would look like with dental veneers, we recommend you have diagnostic wax up or a procedure called PROTOTYPE TECHNIQUE, which will create an image of you with your new veneers. With these procedure, we first take our initial records and then we make a Prototype Smile in the laboratory. While patients are having their dentistry done, we have them wear this provisionary prototype temporaries. This will allow them to adjust to their new look and make sure it's what they want and what feels comfortable. These tools can help you decide if veneers would be a good choice for your smile. Because we custom craft each patient's dental veneers, you can choose the shape, color, and style that best compliments your appearance and the image you want to achieve. When the new smile has been completed, we see the permanent restoration as we did the prototype. This additional procedure will allow us to fine-tune for a very well designed and individualised new smile.

Number of Porcelain Veneer and Lumineer Appointments

The veneer procedure can often be completed in 2-5 dental visits over the course of a four to six-week period.

1. Initial Cosmetic Consultation.

Pre-Treatment Considerations

During your first consultation appointment we examine the condition of your teeth prior to placing minimal preparation , "no-prep", or full prep veneers to ensure that your teeth are clinically sound. In cases where cost is a primary concern and the patient's condition involves only a tiny chip or crack in a single tooth, composite bonding may be a more suitable option. Although less durable and more prone to staining than porcelain veneers, composite bonding would be a less expensive and quicker cosmetic dentistry option.

To determine if you are a candidate for a minimal preparation or "no-prep" veneer procedure, see your dentist for a thorough examination and to discuss your specific cosmetic and dental issues. Your dentist will explain the different cosmetic dentistry options available to meet your particular needs.

2. Appointment for the Prototype Smile (see above details), could be optional appointment depending on the type of veneer and preparation required. During this appointment, you will actively participate in the "smile design process." By sharing your preferences about the shape, length, width and color of the veneers and the effect you want them to have on changing the appearance of your smile, you will help ensure that your veneer treatment will meet your expectations. It is important that your dentist understands your objectives when undergoing a veneer procedure.

3. Preparations for Porcelain Veneers, Lumineers and provisionals(optional) using the Prototype smile or temporaries

4. Permanent bonding or cementation of final porcelain veneers or Lumineers restorations.

Right after the cementation, some patients experience a transient 'SHAPE SHOCK" experience especially with NO PREP Lumineer, until they get used to the new smile. Common to patients who opted not to have the Prototype Smile.

5. Final appointment to check everything is OK

Clinical Procedure with Lumineer

Option 1: NO PREP TECHNIQUE

Involves no removal of any form of tooth structure. Therefore, anesthesia and temporaries are not required. Patients who are scared of the needle, does not want their teeth grinded down will fit in this technique.

It is a conservative procedure in theory, however in most cases, this procedure due to its tendency to leave the teeth over contoured, bulky and quite unaesthetic. The teeth appear bulky and are what is referred to as "over-contoured."

o Since no enamel is scraped off your teeth, lumineers can make your smile appear bulkier. The ramifications of over-contoured teeth, aside from them being unaesthetic, are the fact that it is unhealthy for the gum tissues that support the teeth.

o A slight ridge can be created where the veneer connects with your tooth, which could gather stains around your veneers

o Your teeth can be more vulnerable to tooth decay

o Your gums can be irritated, increasing your chances of gingivitis

Option 2:COSMETIC CONTOUR (ENAMELOPLASTY ONLY) TECHNIQUE

Requires slight reduction, or modification of the enamel but never touches dentin during lumineer placement. No reduction of sensitive tooth structure. Only 0.3-0.5 mm enamel is removed, causing no sensitivity, therefore no need for anesthesia. Minimal contouring is commonly used when cases involve misalignment or reshaping teeth.

With LUMINEERS, can I still chew gum and eat my favorite sticky foods?

Drink and eat whatever you want. LUMINEERS are applied in the most durable way possible. However, LUMINEERS don't replace good hygiene, so you should continue to visit your dentist every 6 months for a check-up and cleaning to keep your LUMINEERS looking their best and the rest of your teeth and gums healthy.

Can LUMINEERS be taken off if I want them removed?

In most cases, Yes. LUMINEERS are normally completely reversible because there's no grinding down of healthy tooth structure. Your natural teeth are normally still intact and strong. If you have any questions about your particular case, come in for a free consultation.

So how difficult is it to remove a veneer once it is already placed?

Well, porcelain veneers are not meant to be removed, there strength and durability is one of the pros for seeking out porcelain veneers as a restorative dental treatment, your cosmetic dentist may have his own technique at removing a porcelain veneer in such cases mentioned above.

Your cosmetic dentist may remove a damaged porcelain veneer by creating a notch in the porcelain veneer and popping them off. The most conservative way to remove veneers is using a Waterlase laser which disconnects the cement right through the porcelain without damaging the tooth underneath.

The porcelain veneer still cannot be rebounded but no inadvertent tooth structure is damaged as in the "notching" technique. Once removed the porcelain veneer cannot be re-used, especially if has been damaged in some manner. Rather, your cosmetic dentist will order a new porcelain veneer from the dental lab to replace the veneer that was removed. Often times, the underlying tooth structure may be freshened up, whitened or polished to help restore the natural brilliance of your porcelain veneers.

Depending on the agreement made between you and your cosmetic dentist, the removal of a good or broken porcelain veneer may require you to endure the cost to fabricate a new porcelain veneer. So, be careful and discerning with your porcelain veneers and they could last you a lifetime.

I am having porcelain veneers put on my front teeth. I would also like to whiten my bottom teeth. Which should I do first?

When deciding on porcelain veneers it is always best to start out with whitening of your teeth to get the desired shade prior to having porcelain veneers placed. Porcelain veneers do not whiten, and thus if your porcelain veneers are placed first and your natural teeth do not get as white as you thought they may, or are whiter than you expected, you have the problem that your porcelain veneers will not match! It is best to tell your dentist that you would also like to whiten your teeth prior to getting your porcelain veneers. Wait 2 to 14 days after whitening to allow the color to settle and then move forward with choosing that final color for your porcelain veneers. This way you can ensure your smile is consistent and your porcelain veneers blend naturally with the rest of your teeth.

Can I Fix My Porcelain Veneers or Lumineers?

Porcelain Veneers are designed to last a long time, so once you can expect on average the lifetime of your porcelain veneers to be 10 to 20 years before they need replacement. Like all things however, porcelain veneers or lumineers require regular maintenance and regularly scheduled cleanings as well as daily brushing and flossing are essential for keeping your porcelain veneers looking bright and healthy.

Sometimes factors may arise in which porcelain veneers need to be repaired or replaced before the anticipated timeline. Such considerations for early replacement or adjustments to your porcelain veneers may be as follows:

o Poor placement of Porcelain Veneers resulting in discomfort or inflammation of the gums

o Porcelain Veneers to do not match the rest of your natural teeth color

o A chip in your porcelain veneer from biting down to hard on ice or accident related injury

o Porcelain Veneer has popped off due to lack of strength in the adhesive material

o Unhappy with design and feel of porcelain veneers received from one cosmetic dentist

o Porcelain Veneers are too bulky or unnatural looking

ith an experienced cosmetic dentist performing the porcelain veneer procedures, it is rare to have any of the above listed concerns, and you are normally given several opportunities to give your input on the shape, size, and color of your porcelain veneer restorations before they are permanently cemented. If however, you do need to address your any of the considerations above, try talking to your cosmetic dentist for steps you both can take to fixing your porcelain veneers. If you would rather seek the consultation of a new cosmetic dentist remember to find a cosmetic dentist with extensive porcelain veneer experience, and look into all of your options. Given the problem listed above with your porcelain veneers, you may need to make a simple adjustment, do some teeth whitening, replace one veneer, or decide that you want new porcelain veneers that are better matched to your style and smile.

Old porcelain veneers can be removed, but it will require some patience and teamwork from you and your cosmetic dentist.

Dental Veneers Cost & Procedure Details

How much money do veneers cost? Dental veneers can serve as a beautiful - albeit expensive - solution for worn tooth enamel, uneven tooth alignment, abnormal spacing, chips and cracks. Although veneers can be pricey, people often are more than happy with their results and feel the benefits far outweigh the cost.

Porcelain veneers are more expensive than their composite resin and Lumineer vneers counterparts.
Veneers Cost Factors

The cost of dental veneers depends on many factors, including:

  • The fees of the cosmetic dentist who performs the procedure.

  • The artistic and technical skill of the ceramist making the veneers and the cosmetic dentist who is applying the veneers.

  • The Cosmetic complexity.

  • The material used.

  • The number of teeth requiring veneers.

  • Beautiful cosmetic dentistry requires the use of expensive materials, first-class cosmetic dental labs, and usually extra time and effort on the part of the cosmetic dentist. All these extra costs are factored into the fee.

How to Care for Porcelain Veneer and Lumineers on Teeth

Lumineers are growing in popularity as they provide a beautiful new smile with extreme affordability and minimal fuss. They are a visually appealing solution for moderate dental deficiencies. Dental care for veneers is no different from regular dental care. Clean and floss your new smile daily, visit us regularly for professional care and maintenance, and consider wearing a night-guard to prevent teeth grinding while you sleep

The following are a few tips that can help extend the lifespan of your Veneers:

LUMINEER AFTERCARE

  • Though Lumineers are extremely durable, you should still avoid consuming large amounts of hard and sticky foods, which can stress the bonding material. To reduce the risk of damage to your veneers, do not bite or chew on hard objects such as nut shells or bones, and do not use your teeth to open or tear packages. Your dentist also may advise you to avoid certain foods that could damage the porcelain or composite used. Chew these foods with your back teeth if it's unavoidable.

  • It's important to avoid foods that can potentially discolor or corrode the bonding cement, such as coffee, red wine, and tea.

  • Keep in mind that smoking habits can also discolor your new Lumineers.

  • Brush and floss your teeth several times a day. The Lumineers are resistant to bacteria and decay, but it is still necessary to maintain the health of your natural teeth.

  • If you play physical contact sports such as football or soccer, your Lumineers are exposed to potential injury. We can create a custom mouth guard so you can continue to do what you love, without damaging your perfect smile.

  • Grinding your teeth frequently at night can damage the Lumineers. If you suffer from night grinding, please contact us immediately so we can create a custom night guard.

  • Using abrasive toothpastes can harm the surface and bonding of your Lumineers. We can provide you with samples and recommendations of less harmful alternatives.

Any Negative Aspects about Lumineers?

Due to their relative ease and quick placement, lumineers do have downfalls that you wouldn't experience with traditional porcelain veneers.

o Finding and matching a color to compliment your hair, skin and eye tone is more difficult

o Your teeth will be lengthened, (without incisal tooth reduction) possibly leaving you with an improper bite

o Also, the lumineers, in NO PREP technique, have a tendency to create a ledge at the gumline since the tooth underneath is not prepared enough. This can cause an area of bacterial trap leading to unhealthy gum situation, which can lead to chronic inflammation and possibly bone loss

o The lumineers are not of enough thickness to allow for proper translucency and tend to look too opaque or have show-through of a dark tooth underneath.

o Porcelain Veneers can be fragile. Porcelain veneers are designed to be strong and durable, but when presented with excessive impact or force like grinding of your teeth or chewing hard foods, porcelain veneers can chip or break.

Porcelain Veneer need to have enough thickness to have strength and, contrary to popular belief, they have to be thick enough to look natural. This allows the ceramist to build in enough translucency and characteristics to mimic the optical qualities of a natural tooth.

Since, It doesn't have the life-like quality of other feldspathic porcelains. The shadings tend to be monochoromatic by itself, without altering the shading/colour of the Lumineer during cementation process.

PLEASE NOTE: Patients who want a highly pronounced life-life tooth appearance with high translucency on the incisal edge (biting surface of the front teeth), polychromatic shading/colour or wanted highly characterized lifelife tooth enamel,, are NOT a good candidate for Lumineer.

What is the difference between porcelain veneers and Lumineers?

  • Lumineers is a brand name of porcelain veneers made from patented porcelain called Cerinate.

  • Lumineers require very little or no tooth reduction. Lumineers are an excellent choice when your teeth are slightly set back or need very minor changes. Lumineers are not right for everyone.

  • If you require more extensive changes (extreme makeovers etc.) traditional Porcelain veneers might be the better choice.

  • Certain parts of smile design process actually become complicated in No prep Technique as procedure is confined to working with shape of the teeth the way they are.

  • Each person needs to be evaluated individually to see which type of veneer in best for them. It might even be a combination of both

Preparation for Traditional Porcelain Veneer and Lumineer.

Lumineers are approximately 1/3 of a millimeter thick; porcelain veneers are 1/2 millimeter thick. This difference is nominal.

Differences in Optical properties between Lumineer and Traditional veneer

Lumineer Before and after (photos courtesy by DenMat)

Traditional Veneer (actual cases of Dr. Zenaidy Castro)

What are some of the Pros and Cons of Porcelain Veneers and Lumineers Veneer?

By now you will have seen that porcelain veneers and lumineers are an obvious way to brighten your smile, correcting tooth discoloration, gaps and spaces, and crooked and chipped teeth. We give you that extra dose of self-confidence and it is obvious that regardless if you are seeking an extreme makeover or just a way to smile and shine, porcelain veneers and lumineers are an excellent restorative procedure that can change your life. So why not get porcelain veneers, well the major issue and one most people will consider before scheduling the procedure with their cosmetic dentist is, money. Porcelain Veneers are not cheap, but they have once been likened to driving up to a business meeting or a date in a brand new corvette.

Below is a list of a few other pros and cons to consider when deciding on whether or not porcelain veneers or lumineers are right for you.

Expert Advice: Porcelain veneers aren't for everyone. Make sure you choose a cosmetic dentist that understands the different dental materials and uses the one the will give you the smile you want while reducing the minimum amount of your tooth structure. A good cosmetic dentist knows when to use bonding, porcelain veneers and crowns and still get the million dollar smile. Your tooth structure is precious and an excellent cosmetic dentist will know when to use minimum or no reduction of your tooth. Experience and training are vital when choosing porcelain veneer treatment.

PROs of Porcelain Veneers and lumineers

  • Porcelain Veneers and Lumineers give you a natural appearance. One of the best features and pros of porcelain veneers is their realistic appearance. Porcelain veneers are made of a ceramic that has many of the same life-like properties of natural enamel. When well crafted, can blend effortlessly into your natural smile.

  • Porcelain Veneers and Lumineers are Stain-Resistant.

  • Porcelain veneers and Lumineers are durable. They are relatively long lasting depending on personal maintenance and upkeep. They can last up to 15-20 years, which is much longer than composite veneer.

  • Porcelain Veneers and Lumineers can be used to whiten teeth. Many times they are used in cases where dark colored teeth have not responded to traditional teeth whitening. In this case, they can be placed to color up tooth discoloration and leave you with a younger, healthier looking smile

  • Porcelain Veneers and Lumineers require minimum amount of tooth preparation. Compared to porcelain veneer alternative treatments, they usually do not require extensive amounts of natural tooth structure to be removed. This makes them more conservative to your tooth structure over your lifetime.

  • Porcelain Veneers and Lumineers Improves Appearance & Restores Confidence. Porcelain veneers and Lumineers are a great way to improve your appearance and restore ones self confidence. Dental flaws such as crooked teeth, tooth discoloration, and small gaps, can be easily corrected with very little trouble by placing porcelain veneers.

CONs of Porcelain Veneers and lumineers

  • Porcelain Veneers and Lumineers are still artificial teeth. Although porcelain veneers look realistic, porcelain veneers are still artificial teeth, which may deter patients seeking a more natural approach to their dental treatment.

  • Porcelain Veneers and Lumineers are expensive. The decision to get porcelain veneers and lumineers hould be viewed as an investment in you and your future.

  • Porcelain Veneers and Lumineers can be fragile. Porcelain veneers are designed to be strong and durable, but when presented with excessive impact or force like grinding of your teeth or chewing hard foods, porcelain veneers and Lumineers can chip or break.

  • Porcelain veneers and Lumineers are permanent. Remember that when your cosmetic dentist places your porcelain veneers and Lumineers with permanent cement, those porcelain veneers are there to stay. Make sure you are 100% happy with the temporaries or Prototype smile or veneers, and have had sufficient time to test out the temporary veneers. Make sure you see the permanents in your mouth before permanent bonding to make sure you are happy with the shade, shape and length before you give the go ahead to cement the porcelain veneers for good.

  • Finally, porcelain veneers and Lumineers are not for everyone, and you may not be a candidate for veneers depending on your oral health or existing tooth structure. An experienced cosmetic dentist should be able to address each individual tooth and come up with a treatment plan that is right for you.

On the whole, however, most people will find that the pros of porcelain veneers and Lumineers far outweigh the cons of porcelain veneers when seeking a cosmetic dental treatment. Veneers are a natural looking restoration, whether you are seeking an instant orthodontic procedure, or something to correct tooth discoloration, crooked teeth, or gaps.

Are Lumineers the Best choice for Dental Veneers?

Lumineers are a conservative approach to whitening, straightening, or simply enhancing the aesthetics of teeth. If you stress and worry about dental visits and the pain you typically experience, lumineers are your best road to a new and affordable smile makeover.

The biggest selling point is that no sensitive enamel is scraped off your teeth and no drilling is required, providing you with a painless smile makeover. If you suffer dental anxiety and hate needles, lumineers are the best options for you to have a new smile.

Since lumineers require less work by your cosmetic dentist and are made of less material, they generally cost less than other porcelain veneers. They are affordable options of having a new smile.

Great for patient who wanted to have a"the hollywood White' smile ie with teeth looking bright and white in all areas of the teeth, pearly or snowy white smile.

Remember changing your smile is a personal decision that can have many positive effects on your life. With any procedure you should take your time and weigh the pros and cons. There's no question that Lumineers can help you get a better looking smile, and in order to do so you must have them done by an experienced cosmetic dentist.

It's vital that you consult with an experience cosmetic dentist who will be honest in his or her assessment of your oral health, gives you many options and see if lumineers are appropriate for you. Still, you need to compare the pros and cons of each before making the right decision for your budget, schedule, health and appearance.
To make sure you choose the type of veneer best suited to your individual needs, we would be happy to advise you to the best path for your smile makeover.

For further info about Lumineers, please visit this link: http://www.lumineers.com/

Looking for an easy yet affordable Cosmetic alternative to A New Smile?

Looking for an easy yet affordable
Cosmetic alternative to A New Smile?

BEFORE AND AFTER

Click image to enlarge

The only affordable and completely reversible
dental smile transformation treatment
Non-invasive, requires no shots, no drilling,
and no adhesives
They fit directly over existing teeth

Snap-On Smile was invented by a dentist who realized that not everyone can afford many thousands of dollars to get a
New smile make-over. A fraction of the price of things like veneers, crowns & bridges.
Snap-On Smile is the only removable, affordable alternative to traditional smile make-over solutions.

Click on the Topic below:

  • Introduction to Snap on Smile

  • What is snap-on smile?

  • Who is snap-on smile for?

  • Who are great Candidates?

  • An alternative to permanent Porcelain Veneers

  • Can you sleep with your Snap-on Smile?

  • How does it attach?

  • Can you wear them everyday? Will it break or tear?

  • CARE INSTRUCTIONS

  • Here is a step by step guide on how to get a Snap-on smile.

A New Smile In A Snap!

Are you looking for brighter teeth, a celebrity-like smile, and an affordable, fast, painless and totally reversible alternative to braces, veneers, crowns, bridges and/or implants? Then the Snap-On Smile might just be perfect for you! No shots, no drills, no needles! No filing down of healthy teeth! You can even eat certain foods while wearing your Snap-On Smile!

We offer Snap-On Smiles as a cosmetic alternative to conventional dental work. Snap-On Smiles can even be used as a great diagnostic tool before proceeding to a more permanent solution.

Even if you "hate the dentist," you can get the "look" of a beautiful smile without any invasive (extensive) surgery - at a fraction of the cost!

Snap-On Smile® is an affordable cosmetic alternative to permanent dental work - priced at a fraction of the cost of a full set of porcelain veneers.
and can be applied to a variety of situations.

The Snap-On Smile is a quick and reversible alternative to having dental work done.
The device is a removable appliance that fits right over the users own teeth. It does not cover the palate or rub on gum tissue, so it should be quite comfortable to wear. It is said to fit snugly over teeth so that it does not come loose when eating or speaking. The resin that it is made of is stain resistant and reportedly easily cleaned. Patients can choose from a variety of 'tooth' shades and shapes.

Snap-on smile is the first and the only affordable, non-invasive and completely reversible dental smile transformation treatment that can quickly get you feeling better about your smile and perhaps also your life! The entire process takes about 4-5 weeks from starting the process to having your own fabulous smile makeover!

NO SHOTS - NO DRILLING - NO ADHESIVES - and YOU CAN EVEN EAT WITH IT!
If youre interested, read more and see if this is the right treatment options for you.

What is snap-on smile?

Snap-on smile is the first, the revolutionary, patented appliance that is non-invasive, requires no shots, no drilling, and no adhesives and the only affordable and completely reversible dental smile transformation treatment that can quickly get you feeling better about your smile and perhaps also your life!

It is molded from your teeth and simply snaps on over your teeth to give you bright white teeth instantly.

Patients can eat while wearing the appliance. Snap-On Smiles retention is completely tooth-borne so it does not impinge on gingival tissue nor cover the palate. It has many applications including use as aesthetic provisionals for implant restorations, as a vehicle for increasing the length of particularly worn down teeth, as cosmetic removable partial dentures, and as a long-term smile enhancement. This can be a great option for people who have heavily stained teeth that bleaching has failed to cure. Snap-On Smile® covers up teeth that are crooked, worn, cracked, chipped, discolored or missing.

Benefits

  • No Shots

  • No Drilling

  • No Adhesives

  • You Can Even Eat with It

  • Easily Snaps Into Place

Major Advantages

The snap-on smile appliance can be made and inserted with:

NO SHOTS - NO DRILLING - NO ADHESIVES - and YOU CAN EVEN EAT WITH IT!

The snap-on smile is a removable dental appliance designed to solve smile problems quickly, affordably and effectively.



Snap-On Smile® is an affordable cosmetic alternative to permanent dental work - priced at a fraction of the cost of a full set of porcelain veneers.

They fit directly over existing teeth and can be applied to a variety of situations.

FAQ's About Snap-On Smile®:

What is Snap-On Smile®?

Snap-On Smile® is a patented, removable custom dental appliance that involves no drills, no prepping, no needles and no adhesives, which simply snaps over a patients natural teeth, and its removable. Its non-invasive, meaning it is also reversible.

Its made with a specialized resin which allows the appliance to be made as thin as .5mm without compromising strength. Flexible yet strong. Its simple patent design allows a patient to eat without any impingement into the gums. For an even more esthetic appearance, Snap-On Smile can be designed with varying thicknesses throughout the appliance to simulate natural contour.

Patients love Snap-On Smile and, while its not a replacement for LUMINEERS, traditional veneers or other restorative options, its often selected as the ideal solution for "special occasion smiles," including weddings, graduations and job interviews. The Snap-On Smile is comfortably worn during eating and is optional, based on patient preference, for sleeping; most patients prefer to remove the appliance for cleaning while they sleep. Its the perfect choice for those who want a "try-in" for a smile makeover and its not at all uncommon for Snap-On Smile patients to elect to pursue permanent restorative treatment such as LUMINEERS one theyve experienced the life-changing benefits of Snap-On Smile.

Snap-It! lives up to its name. It simply "snaps on" to adjacent teeth and provides a stable and esthetic temporary solution for implant patients. It is designed specifically for smaller coverage areas, such as gaps or implants, consisting of six units or less. Unlike traditional flipper appliances, its convenient and simple to place, its non-invasive, and its comfortable and attractive.

About The Inventor

Snap-on smile was invented by restorative dentist, Dr Marc Le iechtung, who recognized that not all patients can receive permanent improvements to their smiles and overall health with dental restorations such as crowns, veneers and implants. He strove to create an attractive, comfortable and affordable solution that was easy for patients to use and to clean.

After eight years of research, he created the patented "snap-on smile"" appliance that simply snaps in and out over patients natural teeth. Made of very thin, but extremely strong, specialized resin that resists staining, snap-on smile can be used for years or worn as a preview and covering over ongoing dental restorations. It should never come loose or fall out. The customized appliance is available for upper and lower teeth and is easy to care for with a special snap-on smile care kit that comes with your snap-on smile appliance.

Who is snap-on smile for?

Snap-on smile is for just about everyone!

Snap-on smile offers a simple, life-changing solution for many patients of all ages; those with crooked, stained or missing teeth or with gaps, patients who are not candidates for implants or bridges, people undergoing full-mouth reconstruction or implant procedures, patients who want to avoid shots and drilling, as well as those who simple want better functioning teeth quickly or a preview of what modern dentistry has to offer. Thousands of patients worldwide have already experienced the benefits of Snap-on smile.

It is known as The Snap-On Smile, a new product that can improve any deficient smile through the use of a specially designed resin material that fits over your teeth and can be removed easily for maintenance. It can be made as thin as .5 mm. without compromising its strength. There are 23 color shades available and any smile design can be achieved. Take a look at the following before and after photos and you can see the dramatic results that this new technology allows us to provide for our patients.

With proper home care, the Snap-On Smile should last three to five years. Since the appliance is removable, you must practice good hygiene. In fact, your oral hygiene should be better than usual. Take the appliance off to clean it and to brush and floss your teeth after every meal or snack. You should start off with soft foods and add harder foods as you get more comfortable.

Does it come in different shades like crowns and dentures do?

You and your dentist can choose from 23 shades and 18 smile designs, giving you an array of choices for your cosmetically enhanced custom fitted appliance.

Who are great Candidates?

Any patient looking for an affordable cosmetic alternative to permanent dental work is a Snap-On Smile® candidate! Well suited for instant gratification, dental phobic and or medically compromised patients, such as chemo or radiation treated patients.

It can also be used in some cases of periodontal disease, as a periodontal splint for mobile teeth by strengthening the teeth going through periodontal treatment. The splint is also helpful because the patient can easily maintain excellent oral hygiene.

Snap-On Smile® appliance is also ideal for those patients considering a more permanent restoration like veneers, which allows them to take their new smile for a test drive. For others Snap-On Smile® gives them options they never had before.

An alternative to permanent Veneers

Uncertain of what the outcome of your new smile may be? Are finances a big challenge for your makeover needs? Dr. Castro now has the ability to provide a temporary solution that costs much less than regular veneers. It is the affordable cosmetic alternative to permanent dental work priced at a fraction of the cost of a set of porcelain veneers.

Can you sleep with them on?

Yes! One of the indications for Snap-On Smile® is that it can be used as a brux guard. So, if have permanent restorations like veneers and want to protect them while you sleep, you can use your Snap-On Smile®. For normal dentition, we DO NOT recommend sleeping with your Snap-On Smile® in place.

How does it attach?

Snap-On Smile® uses the natural curvature of your teeth to hold in place (due to the materials flexibility) by utilizing the heights of contour of each individual tooth.

Can you wear them everyday? Will it break or tear?

Snap-On Smile® can be worn everyday, all day. We suggest that the patient removes and cleans the appliance before going to bed unless the dental professional advises the patient to wear it while sleeping due to bruxism.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS that should be followed in order to care and maintain the appliances long life.

  1. Upon receiving the Snap-On Smile, if it is too tight, leave it on for about 15 minutes to allow it to stretch to your natural teeth.

  2. The Snap-On Smile appliance must be removed at night.

  3. We do not advise eating hard foods, i.e. chicken bones, tough meat, hard breads - like bagels or baguettes, etc.

  4. We advise that you brush your Snap-On Smile after every meal. This will help the appliance maintain its shade.

We recommend that you keep your Snap-On Smile in the provided protective According to the Snap-On Smile: "Snap-On Smile is a patented multi-purpose restorative dental appliance that involves no drills, no cutting down of existing tooth structure, no needles, and its removable. Its non-invasive, meaning it is also reversible. They fit directly over existing teeth and can be applied to a variety of situations. Its made with a specialized resin which allows the appliance to be made as thin as .5mm without compromising strength. Its simple patent design allows a patient to eat without any impingement into the gums."case when you are not wearing it.

Here is a step by step guide on how to get a Snap-on smile.

The entire process takes about 2-3 appointment from starting the process to having your own fabulous smile makeover!

Steps- The process of getting your own snap-on smile is quick and painless.

1. First Appointment-- consult with you on whether the snap-on smile appliance is an appropriate solution to your unique needs. If it is an appropriate solution, you can chose to start the process of getting your new smile the same day as your initial consultation. When you indicate you DO want to have your own snap on smile makeover, we will provide you with an exact fee quote for your unique dental needs. Please note that the basic fee covers the most typical smile needs. Every case is unique of course and calls for unique and customized solutions for the best possible long-term outcomes.

During that first appointment will provide you with an oral health screening and a panoramic x-ray for diagnostic and early detection purposes. The screening is designed to spot if any major dental problems exist in your mouth that would affect your comfort, health and your ability to wear your snap on smile appliance without needing alteration or replacement of the appliance because of unforeseen teeth problems.
If significant dental health concerns exist in your mouth, those concerns will need to be taken care of before your own customized snap-on smile appliance is fabricated and inserted.

2. Second visit, we will take an upper and lower impression.
Then we help you select a custom shape, length and your preferred shade that is just right for you. You may choose from different smile designs and shades for your snap-on smile. In fact, you can choose a celebrity smile as your very own. Want to look like Jessica Simpson, Halle Berry, or George Clooney? You can. Well, your teeth can, anyway.
Lastly, your case is sent to Snap-On Smile Creations for fabrication and within 2-4 week, your beautiful smile is ready to wear. Ready to be "snapped in" - no cementation or bonding is needed!

3.Third Appointment -Insertion.

At the insertion appointment you will also be given your snap-on smile care kit and instructions in how to use the care kit.
No cementation or bonding is ever needed. It will never come loose or fall out.

Composite Dental Bonding

What is tooth bonding (dental bonding)?

Generally speaking the term "tooth bonding" refers to a range of dental procedures each of which is similar in the sense that it employs the use of a type of dental restorative dentists call "dental composite." Tooth bonding offers several benefits for patients. It is quick, affordable and great alternative to more extensive cosmetic dentistry treatment with porcelain veneers, bridges, and crowns. Additionally, the composite resin used in a cosmetic bonding procedure is very flexible, expanding and contracting with the natural tooth to prevent cracks and tooth loss. Dental bonding is an excellent option for individuals looking to repair imperfections in their smile.

For What Conditions Is Dental Bonding Considered?

Dental bonding is an option that can be considered:

  • To repair decayed teeth (composite resins are used to fill cavities)

  • To repair chipped or cracked teeth

  • To improve the appearance of discolored teeth

  • To close spaces between teeth

  • To make teeth look longer

  • To change the shape of teeth

  • As a cosmetic alternative to amalgam fillings

  • To protect a portion of the tooth's root that has been exposed when gums recede

  • Cosmetic applications for dental bonding materials.

    Cosmetic tooth bonding - Dental bonding can be used to create cosmetic enhancements for teeth.

    1) Dental Veneers Veneering of dental bonding over the front side of teeth that have become stained or discolored as a way of enhancing their cosmetic appearance.

    2) Closing a dental gap (diastema). Tooth bonding can be used to fill in gaps that lie between a person's teeth . When this technique is employed, dental composite is bonded onto the sides of the two teeth that lie on either side of the gap, so to widen each tooth slightly. The net effect is that the space between the two teeth is narrowed, or even filled in completely.

    3) Correcting minor cosmetic imperfections. Minor to moderate cosmetic imperfections of chipped, disfigured, or misaligned teeth can be masked or corrected by placing dental bonding.

    How is dental bonding performed?

    The dentist will prepare your tooth for treatment by roughening and shaping or contouring the surface. Then its followed by a process of applying a dilute acid, called Etchand, to the enamel of a tooth to produce a frosted surface which looks microscopically like a series of mountains and valleys. This microscopic roughness is then filled with a liquid plastic called Bonding agent, which acts as a strong adhesive or glue, which, when hardened, mechanically adheres onto the surface of the tooth and allows the further bonding of a glass filled composite filling material. In dental bonding, a composite resin material is applied to the tooth and then sculpted and shaped to cover damaged areas or to fill in gaps. This material comes in several shades so it can be matched to the natural color of your tooth. Several layers of the composite material may be necessary in order to achieve the best results. To cure and harden the material, a high-intensity light or a chemical agent may be used. Finally, your dentist will smooth and polish your tooth to give it an even, natural contour.

    Except in complicated cases, bonding can be accomplished in one visit. The length of the visit will depend on the condition of your teeth and on how much cosmetic or restorative repair work you are having done. It is less time-consuming and less expensive, as no laboratory is involved in the production of the final product. than other tooth restoration methods. Direct bonding is an artistic endeavor on the part of the dentist.

    -back to top-

    What are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Dental Bonding?

    Advantages: Bonding is among the easiest and least expensive of cosmetic dental procedures. Unlike veneers and crowns , which are customized tooth coverings that must be manufactured in a laboratory, bonding usually can be done in one office visit unless several teeth are involved. Another advantage, compared with veneers and crowns, is that the least amount of tooth enamel is removed. Also, unless dental bonding is being performed to fill a cavity , anesthesia is usually not required.

    Disadvantages: Although the material used in dental bonding is somewhat stain resistant, it does not resist stains as well as crowns. Another disadvantage is that the bonding materials do not last as long nor are as strong as other restorative procedures, such as crowns, veneers, or fillings . Additionally, bonding materials can chip and break off the tooth. Because of some of the limitations of bonding, some dentists view bonding as best suited for small cosmetic changes, for temporary correction of cosmetic defects, and for correction of teeth in areas of very low bite pressure (for example, front teeth).

    RISK OF BONDING:
    1. Staining can occur with smoking and excessive amounts of coffeee and tea.
    2. Durability varies but its approximately 3 to 5 years before replacement is required
    3. Chipping or fracturing may necessitate repair or replacement and extra further dental cost
    4. Requires more patient care to prevent staining or future chipping.
    5. Breakage of the bonding materials occurs more readily with bonding than with Porcalain restorations
    6. In short term, it is less costly, but the potential of frequent repairing, replacement or maintenance may mean more expensive in long term plus the time lost involved on frequent dental visit to do repair or maintenance.

    -back to top-

    How Long Does Bonding Material Last?

    The lifespan of bonding materials depends on how much bonding was done and your oral habits. Plastic bonding may last for years but it is less strong than the more durable or longer lasting Porcelain restoration. Typically, however, bonding material lasts from 3 -5 years up to about 10 years before needing to be touched up or replaced. They have a useful life of 3 to 8 years.

    -back to top-

    Recommended Care of Bonded Teeth

    Because bonding material can chip, it is important to avoid such habits as biting fingernails; chewing on pens, ice or other hard food objects; or using your bonded teeth as an opener. If you do notice any sharp edges on a bonded tooth or if your tooth feels odd when you bite down, call your dentist. Follow good oral hygiene practices. Brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss at least once a day and see your dentist for regular professional check-ups and cleanings.

  • Teeth Replacement with Bonding Procedure:
    Aesthetic differences between Composite and Porcelain Material

    Photographs shown above using a Direct Bonding procedure with Composite material

    Photographs shown above using a several units of Fixed Bridge with Porcelain material.
    Note the aesthetic differences in appearance.

    -back to top-

    What's the difference between dental bonding using Composite and Porcelain material?

    Composite bonding is a tooth-colored plastic resin material. Bonding can usually be placed in one visit and is used many times to repair a smaller chip in a tooth or to make aesthetic improvements in more than one tooth. Whereas Cosmetic or Restorative work utilizing Porcelain material, normally involves 2-3 visits. Because they are made out of porcelain in a lab. Porcelain materials are usually more aesthetic in terms of the spectrum of colors, realism and translucency and can exactly mimic the apperance of a natural tooth. Porcelain veneers are also more of a long-term solution than bonding using Composite material, as they do not stain, discolor, and are stronger and durable.

    The photograph shown are actual cases of Dr. Zenaidy Castro. We use our own "before and after" pictures to demonstrate the results of ourservices. We do not suggest that identical (or equivalent) results can be obtained for all patients as every patient is different and such resultscannot be indicated, promised or guaranteed.

    COSMETIC RESULTS MAY VARY FROM PATIENTS TO PATIENT

Dental Crowns and Bridges

What are Dental Crowns and Tooth Bridges?

Both crowns and most bridges are fixed prosthetic devices. Unlike removable devices such as dentures, which you can take out and clean daily, crowns and bridges are cemented onto existing teeth or implants. Tooth crowns and dental bridges are often confused. The difference between a crown and a bridge is that a tooth crown is used to repair and strengthen a damaged or decayed tooth, while a dental bridge is used to replace a missing tooth. Both of these restorations are permanently bonded to your natural tooth or teeth. These restorations are used to correct your bite and restore your teeth's strength and function, as well as give you back a beautiful, full smile if you are missing any teeth.

How are Crowns and Bridges Made?

Before either a crown or a bridge can be made, the tooth (or teeth) must be reduced in size so that the crown or bridge will fit over it properly. After reducing the tooth/teeth, your dentist will take an impression to provide an exact mold for the crown or bridge. If porcelain is to be used, your dentist will determine the correct shade for the crown or bridge to match the color of your existing teeth.
Using this impression, a dental lab then makes your crown or bridge, in the material your dentist specifies. A temporary crown or bridge will be put in place to cover the prepared tooth while the permanent crown or bridge is being made. When the permanent crown or bridge is ready, the temporary crown or bridge is removed, and the new crown or bridge is cemented over your prepared tooth or teeth.

Essentially, a bridge is a fake tooth that is fused between two dental crowns. Unlike a dental implant, crowns on either side of the tooth gap support the bridge. Bridgework begins by shaping the teeth on either side of the gap so that they can be fitted with tooth crowns. Then, an impression of both the teeth and the gap is made so that a custom bridge can be made that perfectly fits your teeth. While the custom bridge is being created, you will be fitted with a temporary bridge so that you can begin to feel what the real reparation is like.
When the permanent, custom bridge is finished, can be removed and the permanent one can be bonded to your teeth. With your bridge in place, you can once again eat the foods you like and smile with confidence, knowing that there are no gaps in your smile. If you have more than one missing tooth, then a combination of a bridge and dental implants, partial dentures, or full dentures might better serve your dental needs.

How Long do Crowns and Bridges Last?

While crowns and bridges can last a lifetime, they do sometimes come loose or fall out. The most important step you can take to ensure the longevity of your crown or bridge is to practice good oral hygiene. A bridge can lose its support if the teeth or bone holding it in place are damaged by dental disease. Keep your gums and teeth healthy by Brushing with fluoride toothpaste twice a day and flossing daily. Also see your dentist and hygienist regularly for checkups and professional cleanings.

To prevent damage to your new crown or bridge, avoid chewing hard foods, ice or other hard objects.

MORE ABOUT DENTAL CROWNS

How do Crowns Work?

A crown is a restorative that covers, or "caps," to strengthened a damaged tooth to restore it to its normal shape and size. Crown can be used to improve the tooth appearance, shape or alignment. Crowns are necessary when a tooth is generally broken down and fillings won't solve the problem. If a tooth is cracked a crown holds the tooth together to seal the cracks so the damage doesn't get worse. Crowns are also used to support large fillings when there is not enough tooth surface remaining to attach a bridge. Crowns protect weaker teeth from fracturing or restore fractured teeth and they also cover badly shaped or discolored teeth.

CHOICES IN THE MATERIAL OF CROWN

Crowns can be made in three different ways.

1. Gold crowns - Gold is very durable but obviously not as aesthetically pleasing as porcelain, which looks like your natural tooth. Gold is more durable than porcelain on chewing surfaces so it is sometimes preferable when a molar needs a crown. These alloys are generally stronger than porcelain and may be recommended for back teeth.

2. Porcelain fused-to-metal - These crowns have a metal, sometimes gold, lining inside the porcelain exterior. They are natural looking because the porcelain is on the outside and more durable than porcelain alone because of the metal lining. One caution for these types of crowns is that as the years pass and your gums start to recede, the metal lining can show as a dark line along the gum line, thus negating the aesthetic look that you first wanted to achieve.

As mentioned, because of a metal lining, though covered with porcelain, on the aesthetic zone or on the front area of the mouth, If we can avoid using them, All Ceramic or Procelain Crown would give the best aestheitc result. When placed, they usually look opaque or "flat" because they do not let light pass through like a natural tooth. There is often a tell-tail dark line next to the gum-line that is undesirable (often the darkness invades the adjacent gum tissue as an adverse reaction).

3. Composite Crown - Composite crowns provide a good "temporary" cheaper alternative to porcelain crowns for the short term. They will eventually wear down or break and you should expect to have your composite crowns replaced or "upgraded" to a porcelain or gold crown.

4. Porcelain crowns - the most natural in appearance because of their transparent properties. They are strong and durable.

The most beautiful crown for a tooth is, without question, all-porcelain or all-ceramic. With porcelain fused to metal crowns, there has to be an opaque layer put over the metal to block out its color. This makes it impossible to have a translucent restoration that mimics the translucency of natural teeth. Only with pure porcelain or pure ceramic can you have such translucency.

CHOICES IN ALL-PORCELAIN AND ALL-CERAMIC CROWNS

There are various types of all-porcelain or all-ceramic crowns. Let's explain the differences between some of them:

1.The Procera crown - Procera is a milled ceramic on the inside with a more traditional porcelain baked onto the outside. The advantage of Procera is its exceptional strength. However, the milled ceramic core is opaque white, so many cosmetic dentists feel that it isn't as natural-looking as the more translucent materials. An advantage of Procera is that it doesn't have to be bonded to the tooth but can be cemented with ordinary crown and bridge cement.

2. The Lava crown - Lava is similar to Procera, but the milled ceramic on the inside is a more translucent Zirconia, rather than an opaque white material. The Zirconia is shaded, and then the final esthetics of the crown are achieved in the baked-on outer layer. The Lava crown can also be cemented with traditional techniques. However, any crown cemented with a traditional crown and bridge cement is going to be susceptible to a compromise in the appearance if that cement line ever shows.

3. Feldspathic porcelain is the standard, traditional porcelain that is used for crowns. Many cosmetic dentists feel that this is the most beautiful porcelain.
The Empress crown - Empress is strictly speaking not a porcelain, but is more like a glass. It can be called a ceramic material. The Empress material is cast rather than baked as a feldspathic porcelain crown is. The fit of Empress is more precise than the baked feldspathic porcelain. However, the color in Empress is mostly baked on the outside. Empress can be very beautiful. For appearance's sake, some expert cosmetic dentists prefer the feldspathic porcelain, and some prefer the Empress.

4. The Cerec crown - Cerec is are also milled from a block of very hard ceramic material. What's unique about Cerec is that the crown is milled by a computer in the dentist's office rather than in a separate dental laboratory. Thus, the dentist doesn't have to send out for it to be made-it can be made on the spot. So, no second appointment is required, and no wearing of a temporary crown between appointments. Cerec is milled from a block of ceramic that is a single color, so it is generally not considered esthetic enough for demanding cosmetic dentists. A few exceptional dentists who are artists, however, are able to custom stain Cerec for front teeth so that they are truly beautiful. Some even make Cerec veneers that can be placed the same day. To be precise, Cerec is actually a technique and not a material. There are several companies that make ceramic materials for use in Cerec machines.

5.The InCeram crown - InCeram is made of a very dense and very tough aluminous porcelain. It also has excellent esthetics, but is more opaque than feldspathic porcelain. InCeram is also strong enough to be cemented with traditional dental cement.
There are other types of all-ceramic crowns. We're not going to list all of them here.

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF ALL-PORCELAIN AND ALL-CERAMIC CROWNS

Let's compare all-porcelain with porcelain fused to metal.

All-porcelain is generally not as strong as porcelain fused to metal. It has to be bonded to the tooth in order to have adequate strength for oral function. The bonding technique is very demanding.
With porcelain fused to metal, the porcelain has to be opaque in order to block out the appearance of the metal underneath. They all also eventually develop an unsightly dark line at the margin where the edge of the crown meets the tooth.

Some of the all-ceramic systems that have an inner ceramic core with an outer layer of porcelain baked on require more tooth reduction. Grinding away more of the tooth is often not desirable.

Some of the ceramic materials that are very tough and fracture resistant are also quite abrasive against the opposing teeth. Of the crowns listed above, the Empress is the kindest to the teeth it chews against. There are several factors that need to go into the selection of a crown material: strength requirements, esthetic requirements, the abrasivity of the material against the opposing teeth, and the skills of the dentist.

There is not a single crown that is clearly superior for all situations. Many cosmetic dentists will have several types that they will use, each for a different situation.

What are Dental Crowns and Tooth Bridges?

Both crowns and most bridges are fixed prosthetic devices. Unlike removable devices such as dentures, which you can take out and clean daily, crowns and bridges are cemented onto existing teeth or implants. Tooth crowns and dental bridges are often confused. The difference between a crown and a bridge is that a tooth crown is used to repair and strengthen a damaged or decayed tooth, while a dental bridge is used to replace a missing tooth. Both of these restorations are permanently bonded to your natural tooth or teeth. These restorations are used to correct your bite and restore your teeth's strength and function, as well as give you back a beautiful, full smile if you are missing any teeth.

How are Crowns and Bridges Made?

Before either a crown or a bridge can be made, the tooth (or teeth) must be reduced in size so that the crown or bridge will fit over it properly. After reducing the tooth/teeth, your dentist will take an impression to provide an exact mold for the crown or bridge. If porcelain is to be used, your dentist will determine the correct shade for the crown or bridge to match the color of your existing teeth.
Using this impression, a dental lab then makes your crown or bridge, in the material your dentist specifies. A temporary crown or bridge will be put in place to cover the prepared tooth while the permanent crown or bridge is being made. When the permanent crown or bridge is ready, the temporary crown or bridge is removed, and the new crown or bridge is cemented over your prepared tooth or teeth.

Essentially, a bridge is a fake tooth that is fused between two dental crowns. Unlike a dental implant, crowns on either side of the tooth gap support the bridge. Bridgework begins by shaping the teeth on either side of the gap so that they can be fitted with tooth crowns. Then, an impression of both the teeth and the gap is made so that a custom bridge can be made that perfectly fits your teeth. While the custom bridge is being created, you will be fitted with a temporary bridge so that you can begin to feel what the real reparation is like.
When the permanent, custom bridge is finished, can be removed and the permanent one can be bonded to your teeth. With your bridge in place, you can once again eat the foods you like and smile with confidence, knowing that there are no gaps in your smile. If you have more than one missing tooth, then a combination of a bridge and dental implants, partial dentures, or full dentures might better serve your dental needs.

How Long do Crowns and Bridges Last?

While crowns and bridges can last a lifetime, they do sometimes come loose or fall out. The most important step you can take to ensure the longevity of your crown or bridge is to practice good oral hygiene. A bridge can lose its support if the teeth or bone holding it in place are damaged by dental disease. Keep your gums and teeth healthy by Brushing with fluoride toothpaste twice a day and flossing daily. Also see your dentist and hygienist regularly for checkups and professional cleanings.

To prevent damage to your new crown or bridge, avoid chewing hard foods, ice or other hard objects.

MORE ABOUT DENTAL CROWNS

How do Crowns Work?

A crown is a restorative that covers, or "caps," to strengthened a damaged tooth to restore it to its normal shape and size. Crown can be used to improve the tooth appearance, shape or alignment. Crowns are necessary when a tooth is generally broken down and fillings won't solve the problem. If a tooth is cracked a crown holds the tooth together to seal the cracks so the damage doesn't get worse. Crowns are also used to support large fillings when there is not enough tooth surface remaining to attach a bridge. Crowns protect weaker teeth from fracturing or restore fractured teeth and they also cover badly shaped or discolored teeth.

CHOICES IN THE MATERIAL OF CROWN

Crowns can be made in three different ways.

1. Gold crowns - Gold is very durable but obviously not as aesthetically pleasing as porcelain, which looks like your natural tooth. Gold is more durable than porcelain on chewing surfaces so it is sometimes preferable when a molar needs a crown. These alloys are generally stronger than porcelain and may be recommended for back teeth.

2. Porcelain fused-to-metal - These crowns have a metal, sometimes gold, lining inside the porcelain exterior. They are natural looking because the porcelain is on the outside and more durable than porcelain alone because of the metal lining. One caution for these types of crowns is that as the years pass and your gums start to recede, the metal lining can show as a dark line along the gum line, thus negating the aesthetic look that you first wanted to achieve.

As mentioned, because of a metal lining, though covered with porcelain, on the aesthetic zone or on the front area of the mouth, If we can avoid using them, All Ceramic or Procelain Crown would give the best aestheitc result. When placed, they usually look opaque or "flat" because they do not let light pass through like a natural tooth. There is often a tell-tail dark line next to the gum-line that is undesirable (often the darkness invades the adjacent gum tissue as an adverse reaction).

3. Composite Crown - Composite crowns provide a good "temporary" cheaper alternative to porcelain crowns for the short term. They will eventually wear down or break and you should expect to have your composite crowns replaced or "upgraded" to a porcelain or gold crown.

4. Porcelain crowns - the most natural in appearance because of their transparent properties. They are strong and durable.

The most beautiful crown for a tooth is, without question, all-porcelain or all-ceramic. With porcelain fused to metal crowns, there has to be an opaque layer put over the metal to block out its color. This makes it impossible to have a translucent restoration that mimics the translucency of natural teeth. Only with pure porcelain or pure ceramic can you have such translucency.

CHOICES IN ALL-PORCELAIN AND ALL-CERAMIC CROWNS

There are various types of all-porcelain or all-ceramic crowns. Let's explain the differences between some of them:

1.The Procera crown - Procera is a milled ceramic on the inside with a more traditional porcelain baked onto the outside. The advantage of Procera is its exceptional strength. However, the milled ceramic core is opaque white, so many cosmetic dentists feel that it isn't as natural-looking as the more translucent materials. An advantage of Procera is that it doesn't have to be bonded to the tooth but can be cemented with ordinary crown and bridge cement.

2. The Lava crown - Lava is similar to Procera, but the milled ceramic on the inside is a more translucent Zirconia, rather than an opaque white material. The Zirconia is shaded, and then the final esthetics of the crown are achieved in the baked-on outer layer. The Lava crown can also be cemented with traditional techniques. However, any crown cemented with a traditional crown and bridge cement is going to be susceptible to a compromise in the appearance if that cement line ever shows.

3. Feldspathic porcelain is the standard, traditional porcelain that is used for crowns. Many cosmetic dentists feel that this is the most beautiful porcelain.
The Empress crown - Empress is strictly speaking not a porcelain, but is more like a glass. It can be called a ceramic material. The Empress material is cast rather than baked as a feldspathic porcelain crown is. The fit of Empress is more precise than the baked feldspathic porcelain. However, the color in Empress is mostly baked on the outside. Empress can be very beautiful. For appearance's sake, some expert cosmetic dentists prefer the feldspathic porcelain, and some prefer the Empress.

4. The Cerec crown - Cerec is are also milled from a block of very hard ceramic material. What's unique about Cerec is that the crown is milled by a computer in the dentist's office rather than in a separate dental laboratory. Thus, the dentist doesn't have to send out for it to be made-it can be made on the spot. So, no second appointment is required, and no wearing of a temporary crown between appointments. Cerec is milled from a block of ceramic that is a single color, so it is generally not considered esthetic enough for demanding cosmetic dentists. A few exceptional dentists who are artists, however, are able to custom stain Cerec for front teeth so that they are truly beautiful. Some even make Cerec veneers that can be placed the same day. To be precise, Cerec is actually a technique and not a material. There are several companies that make ceramic materials for use in Cerec machines.

5.The InCeram crown - InCeram is made of a very dense and very tough aluminous porcelain. It also has excellent esthetics, but is more opaque than feldspathic porcelain. InCeram is also strong enough to be cemented with traditional dental cement.
There are other types of all-ceramic crowns. We're not going to list all of them here.

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF ALL-PORCELAIN AND ALL-CERAMIC CROWNS

Let's compare all-porcelain with porcelain fused to metal.

All-porcelain is generally not as strong as porcelain fused to metal. It has to be bonded to the tooth in order to have adequate strength for oral function. The bonding technique is very demanding.
With porcelain fused to metal, the porcelain has to be opaque in order to block out the appearance of the metal underneath. They all also eventually develop an unsightly dark line at the margin where the edge of the crown meets the tooth.

Some of the all-ceramic systems that have an inner ceramic core with an outer layer of porcelain baked on require more tooth reduction. Grinding away more of the tooth is often not desirable.

Some of the ceramic materials that are very tough and fracture resistant are also quite abrasive against the opposing teeth. Of the crowns listed above, the Empress is the kindest to the teeth it chews against. There are several factors that need to go into the selection of a crown material: strength requirements, esthetic requirements, the abrasivity of the material against the opposing teeth, and the skills of the dentist.

There is not a single crown that is clearly superior for all situations. Many cosmetic dentists will have several types that they will use, each for a different situation.

Porcelain Veneers

About Porcelain Veneers

These are also called "porcelain laminates," "porcelain laminate veneers," and just "veneers,"

For our purposes, we will just call them veneers. Veneers are formed porcelain shells that are used to create a new front surface to a tooth. These are thin sculpted pieces of tooth-shaped porcelain that fit over the front of the teeth and are the premier standard of care in cosmetic dentistry.

Permanently bonded to the front surface of a tooth, to restore or improve position, shape and tooth color, they can make a dramatic, immediate difference to one's smile and overall facial appearance. Veneers are wonderful for fixing common problems such as midline spaces (the gap-toothed look of the two front upper teeth) or chipped, crooked, missing, discolored, pitted, malformed or improperly positioned teeth. They can be custom-designed to fit your face, smile, gender and personality.

Once only accessible to the wealthy and top Hollywood stars and models, veneers are now a popular way for many people to obtain the smile of their dreams.

Porcelain veneers make it possible for everyone to have a beautiful smile, not just celebrities. The Dentist in London wants you to know that you don't have to live with less than dazzling teeth. Porcelain veneers can cover many imperfections in the teeth by bonding a thin shell directly to the tooth enamel.

Although porcelain veneers are thin, they are extremely durable and stain-resistant. They come in different shades of white so you can select the color you prefer best. We will help you choose a natural-looking color, prep your teeth and then fit the porcelain veneers to your enamel. Once they are bonded to the teeth, they will blend in seamlessly without any telltale signs that you have had any dental work done. People will only see your beautiful smile

If you have severely discolored teeth that do not respond to tooth whitening methods, veneers can brighten your teeth.


Porcelain veneers may not be right for you

1. If you have unhealthy teeth. Porcelain veneers cannot be placed on teeth where there is decay or active periodontal disease (gum disease). These conditions must be treated before porcelain veneers can be successfully fabricated and placed.

2. If you have weakened teeth. If a significant amount of tooth structure has been lost as a result of decay or fracture, or else already replaced by a dental filling, the tooth may not be a good candidate for a porcelain veneer. Porcelain veneers do not significantly strengthen the teeth on which they are placed. Teeth that have had a history of significant tooth loss structure are usually better off being treated by the placement of a dental crown, and not a porcelain veneer.

3. If you have an inadequate amount of enamel on the tooth. A porcelain veneer can only be successfully bonded onto tooth enamel. Some teeth, as a result of excessive wear or previous attempts at dental bonding, may have little or no enamel remaining on their frontside. These teeth do not make good candidates for porcelain veneers.

4. If you clench or grind your teeth. Persons who clench and grind their teeth can make poor candidates for porcelain veneers. The forces created by these activities, termed bruxism by dentists, can easily chip or break porcelain veneers. Possibly a person can successfully control their bruxing habits during their waking hours, but during sleep a bruxer has essentially no control over this activity. If a person who bruxes does have veneers placed, they must be committed to wearing a plastic dental night guard when they sleep so as to minimize the amount of stress placed on their veneers.

Longevity - How long do dental veneers last?

There are no hard and fast rules about how long porcelain veneers will last. While you can certainly expect your veneers to last many years (some patients have had them for 20 or more years), it is unrealistic to expect them to last forever. With good home care and by exercising good judgment, it seems likely that a porcelain veneer could last well in excess of 10 to 15 years. Ask about our 3-year limited warranty. To make your veneers last longer it is important to follow a good oral hygiene program and also visit your dentist for check ups on a regular basis.

Plastic veneers, bonding and porcelain veneers

Composite bonding (also sometimes called "direct veneers" or "plastic veneers") is a tooth-colored plastic resin material. Bonding can usually be placed in one visit and is used many times to repair a smaller chip in a tooth or to make aesthetic improvements in more than one tooth. Bonding usually requires little to no tooth reduction or anesthesia. Porcelain veneers are usually more aesthetic in terms of the spectrum of colors, realism and translucency because they are made in a lab out of porcelain. Porcelain veneers are also more of a long-term solution than bonding, as they do not stain, discolor, and are stronger than bonding. Porcelain veneers usually require only a couple of office visits - the first visit to prepare the teeth and the second to seat the veneers.

So which are better composite veneers or porcelain veneers?


The most popular type of veneers are porcelain, which offer a stronger and more durable alternative to its composite counterpart. Composite veneers are also more prone to staining and do not last as long as porcelain veneers which also offer more a natural looking, translucent tooth-like appearance. Composite veneers are much cheaper than porcelain veneers in general, but considering that they do not last as long and need replacing more often they could end up costing more in the long run.

Composite work is ideal for small chips as this treatment preserves more of your natural tooth structure.
-

Difference on aesthetic appearance between Composite Veneers and Porcelain Veneers

Composite Veneers

Porcelain Veneers

How do porcelain veneers work? Treatment Process

The porcelain veneer procedure takes place over at least two office visits.
The first part of any dental procedure is the initial consultation and examination so that the dentist can get a feel for what you want and understand your needs and concerns. The dentist should explain the treatment procedure to you including an accurate guide to the likely costs of your treatment.

During your initial visit, your teeth will be prepared for the veneers. This may consist of simply roughening, reshape and prepare the front surfaces of your teeth so that they can accomadate the veneersor, in cases where the veneers are used to correct structural issues such as crowding, the teeth may be shaped more extensively in preparation.

Once your teeth are prepared, a precise impression will be taken of your teeth. This will be used to fabricate your personal porcelain veneers so they fit securely to the tooth surface. whilst you are waiting for your veneers to be fabricated your dentist you may be fitted with some temporary veneers to protect your prepared teeth. Not all dentists will offer temporary veneers.

When you arrive for your next visit, your custom made porcelain veneers will be available for your inspection, and will then be bonded to the existing tooth, leaving you with the bright, white, youthful looking smile you've dreamed of.

The process involves removing a small amount of tooth structure to make room for the veneers. The dental lab then fabricates the veneers from impressions. After placement, the veneers look like natural teeth. Some advantages of porcelain veneers over bonding include increased longevity, and resistance to staining.

-back to top-

Maintenance and recommended care

With proper home care and scheduled dental visits, veneers can provide you with a beautiful smile for many years. A week or two after the placement of your veneers, we ask that you return to our office for a cosmetic polish and treatment evaluation. This visit is extremely important. It gives us the opportunity to evaluate the placement of the veneers, the tissue response and to answer any questions you might have regarding your new smile makeover. For example, if you grind or clench your teeth, please let us know. We can fabricate a soft night guard for you to wear to minimize the stresses placed upon your teeth while you sleep.

The maintenance of your porcelain veneers is relatively simple. Brush and floss as you normally would to prevent oral hygiene problems. Once placed, veneers are typically the kindest restoration to the gum tissues that we currently have available. Don't be afraid that you'll damage your veneers by either flossing or brushing. Any non-abrasive toothpaste is acceptable. A good home care regimen will help ensure the aesthetic success of your veneers.

Another important point is that oral habits such as nail biting, opening bobby pins and chewing on hard objects could damage your new veneers.

-back to top-

Dietary changes

Once placed, your veneers are very strong and will resist most of the forces placed upon them by a normal diet, so a normal diet should pose no problem at all. Porcelain has great crushing strength but poor tensile strength. Therefore, you should avoid anything that will bend or twist the veneers. Thus some precautions on eating habits as with bonding and crowing, As with your regular teeth, opening bottle caps with your teeth or biting into or crunching on hard candy or ice is not a good idea. They will not be as strong as enamel. Margins needs eventually resealing.

-back to top-

A Final Word

The decision to enhance your smile with porcelain veneers is a very personal one. Even a subtle change in your smile can make an exceptional difference in the way you look and feel - and. on your social outlook. When you feel good, you look great. And that helps you project an image of self-confidence and high personal esteem. If you have any further questions about porcelain veneers, please call us now.

  • Crooked teeth or Misshapen Teeth

  • Stained teeth

  • Cracked teeth

  • Chipped or pitted teeth

  • Unevenly sized and shaped teeth

  • Broken Teeth

  • Gaps in Teeth or diastemas (spaces between the teeth)

  • Disfigured Teeth

  • Whiten Dark, Yellow or Permanently stained or Discolored Teeth

  • Unsightly, stained or washed out fillings

  • An ageing Smile

I'm not young anymore and don't want to wear metal braces. What are my options?

About Cosmetic dentistry and "Instant Orthodontics with Porcelain veneers


Instant Orthodontics: A Smile makeover is sometimes referred to as instant orthodontics, but in fact a smile makeover can achieve much more than orthodontics. While orthodontia can reposition your existing teeth over 18-24 months with the use of braces it cannot change the color, size or shape of your existing teeth.

This is where a smile makeover has a distinct advantage. With porcelain veneers you can change the color, size, shape and positioning of your teeth and create a whole new smile. Not to mention the fact that it can be done in as little as two weeks! Porcelain veneers are the fastest way to straighten teeth without traditional braces. The only difference is, your natural teeth will have to be prepped to fit the veneers. This is a permanent solution that many patients elect to proceed with because of the great results you can achieve with your smile. Different than with braces with instant orthodontics "porcelain veneers" you can choose the shade of white you want for your teeth.

Instant orthodontics usually takes place in approx 2 visits, so it should really be named almost instant orthodontics, still much better than waiting 1-3 years to have straight teeth.

The Allure of Instant Orthodontics:

Imagine a whole new beautiful smile in as little as two visits. For many patients, we can straighten severely crooked teeth in two weeks rather than a number of years as with traditional orthodontics.

It's no longer just for movie stars and super models. The benefits of porcelain veneers over other cosmetic dentistry options are many: they are extremely durable and easy to maintain. A pleasing smile is a great way to boost your self-confidence.

"Instant orthodontics" is a term that sometimes refers to a cosmetic dental procedure where we place porcelain veneers, crowns or bonding to artistically create the illusion of straight teeth. The advantage of this procedure is that we obtain immediate results. Some adult patients are reluctant to have a conventional orthodontic treatment as recommended. They feel that wearing awkward metal braces for a number of years is too high a price to pay for straight teeth. They want immediate results to correct misalignment of their overcrowded front teeth and other conditions.


If your bite is healthy, you are a candidate for Instant Orthodontics if:

    • You dislike the appearance of your smile.

    • Your teeth are crooked, several teeth overlap from a crowded mouth

    • You want to lengthen your teeth

    • Your teeth are uneven.

    • You have gaps or spaces between your teeth.

    • You have excessive crowding of your teeth.

    • You want to hide slight crookedness

    • Change the shape and color of teeth

The procedure is designed to be long term and look totally natural. Instant Orthodontics with Porcelain veneers are a speedy way to remedy some orthodontic problems that once took many months, even years to resolve. Gaps and misalignments that once could only be fixed with a mouthful of metal braces can now be made to disappear "instantly." In only a few visits over a span of two to three weeks, the entire process can be completed and you can look into the mirror at a stunningly beautiful new smile.

The final result creates a great deal of happiness and satisfaction to them. You may be a candidate for this procedure if you would like your teeth to look straighter and like many adults, do not want to commit to the time for conventional orthodontics. The most ideal candidates already have a need for porcelain veneers or porcelain crowns.

It's easier than you think! Come in and see the dozens of photos we have of satisfied patients who have made the change. View the before and after photos featured below of patients who have had porcelain veneers placed.

View the before and after photos featured below of patients who have had porcelain veneers placed.

-back to top-

Procedure Description of "Instant Orthodontics"

Instant Orthodontics is a cosmetic dental procedure where we place porcelain veneers, crowns or bonding to artistically create the illusion of straight teeth, even, creates white smile. Most "instant orthodontics" uses porcelain veneers to correct and beautify a smile.

The advantage of this procedure is that we obtain immediate results. Instead of wearing braces for years, the same results can be accomplished in as little as a month! The procedure is designed to be long term and look totally natural.

Is Instant Orthodontics for Everyone?

You would need to have no bruxism issues (clenching and/or grinding the teeth). Such a habit would damage the teeth which met the veneered teeth when your mouth was closed. That's because porcelain is stronger than tooth enamel. You would also need to have no decayed teeth or periodontal disease. Most problems can be overcome; however, with veneers attached as an ending procedure.

What about complications?

Complications from dental procedures are rare. Sometimes bacterial infections can occur following the procedure, but they can easily be treated with antibiotics. And in some remote cases, the teeth could be devitalized and might need pre-operative or Elective Endodontic Therapy.

What can I expect?

Realistically, you can expect a very nice, very natural-looking smile. It's often best to ask for photos of our previous work.

About Cosmetic dentistry and "Instant Orthodontics with Porcelain veneers


Instant Orthodontics: A Smile makeover is sometimes referred to as instant orthodontics, but in fact a smile makeover can achieve much more than orthodontics. While orthodontia can reposition your existing teeth over 18-24 months with the use of braces it cannot change the color, size or shape of your existing teeth.

This is where a smile makeover has a distinct advantage. With porcelain veneers you can change the color, size, shape and positioning of your teeth and create a whole new smile. Not to mention the fact that it can be done in as little as two weeks! Porcelain veneers are the fastest way to straighten teeth without traditional braces. The only difference is, your natural teeth will have to be prepped to fit the veneers. This is a permanent solution that many patients elect to proceed with because of the great results you can achieve with your smile. Different than with braces with instant orthodontics "porcelain veneers" you can choose the shade of white you want for your teeth.

Instant orthodontics usually takes place in approx 2 visits, so it should really be named almost instant orthodontics, still much better than waiting 1-3 years to have straight teeth.

The Allure of Instant Orthodontics:

Imagine a whole new beautiful smile in as little as two visits. For many patients, we can straighten severely crooked teeth in two weeks rather than a number of years as with traditional orthodontics.

It's no longer just for movie stars and super models. The benefits of porcelain veneers over other cosmetic dentistry options are many: they are extremely durable and easy to maintain. A pleasing smile is a great way to boost your self-confidence.

"Instant orthodontics" is a term that sometimes refers to a cosmetic dental procedure where we place porcelain veneers, crowns or bonding to artistically create the illusion of straight teeth. The advantage of this procedure is that we obtain immediate results. Some adult patients are reluctant to have a conventional orthodontic treatment as recommended. They feel that wearing awkward metal braces for a number of years is too high a price to pay for straight teeth. They want immediate results to correct misalignment of their overcrowded front teeth and other conditions.


If your bite is healthy, you are a candidate for Instant Orthodontics if:

    • You dislike the appearance of your smile.

    • Your teeth are crooked, several teeth overlap from a crowded mouth

    • You want to lengthen your teeth

    • Your teeth are uneven.

    • You have gaps or spaces between your teeth.

    • You have excessive crowding of your teeth.

    • You want to hide slight crookedness

    • Change the shape and color of teeth

The procedure is designed to be long term and look totally natural. Instant Orthodontics with Porcelain veneers are a speedy way to remedy some orthodontic problems that once took many months, even years to resolve. Gaps and misalignments that once could only be fixed with a mouthful of metal braces can now be made to disappear "instantly." In only a few visits over a span of two to three weeks, the entire process can be completed and you can look into the mirror at a stunningly beautiful new smile.

The final result creates a great deal of happiness and satisfaction to them. You may be a candidate for this procedure if you would like your teeth to look straighter and like many adults, do not want to commit to the time for conventional orthodontics. The most ideal candidates already have a need for porcelain veneers or porcelain crowns.

It's easier than you think! Come in and see the dozens of photos we have of satisfied patients who have made the change. View the before and after photos featured below of patients who have had porcelain veneers placed.

View the before and after photos featured below of patients who have had porcelain veneers placed.

-back to top-

Procedure Description of "Instant Orthodontics"

Instant Orthodontics is a cosmetic dental procedure where we place porcelain veneers, crowns or bonding to artistically create the illusion of straight teeth, even, creates white smile. Most "instant orthodontics" uses porcelain veneers to correct and beautify a smile.

The advantage of this procedure is that we obtain immediate results. Instead of wearing braces for years, the same results can be accomplished in as little as a month! The procedure is designed to be long term and look totally natural.

Is Instant Orthodontics for Everyone?

You would need to have no bruxism issues (clenching and/or grinding the teeth). Such a habit would damage the teeth which met the veneered teeth when your mouth was closed. That's because porcelain is stronger than tooth enamel. You would also need to have no decayed teeth or periodontal disease. Most problems can be overcome; however, with veneers attached as an ending procedure.

What about complications?

Complications from dental procedures are rare. Sometimes bacterial infections can occur following the procedure, but they can easily be treated with antibiotics. And in some remote cases, the teeth could be devitalized and might need pre-operative or Elective Endodontic Therapy.

What can I expect?

Realistically, you can expect a very nice, very natural-looking smile. It's often best to ask for photos of our previous work.


Click here to View the before and after photos featured below of patients who have had Instant Orthodontics with porcelain veneers placed.

Frequently asked questions about Teeth Whitening

The most important question people ask is, what treatment is best? Professional teeth whitening treatments performed by the dentist or using an at-home whitener?

In order to answer that question, let's take a closer look at the procedures... Peroxide based teeth whitening is determined by the concentration of peroxide in the whitener and the amount of time the whitener is in contact with the surface of the teeth. So for the teeth to whiten, they need to be exposed to an appropriate teeth whitener for an appropriate amount of time. Hence, in order to get the same degree of lightening, a teeth whitening system may either employ a low concentration whitener for a long period of time (at home teeth whitening products use this method) or a higher concentration whitener for a short period of time (professional teeth whitening treatments performed by dentists use this method). If you are using at-home teeth whitening kit, you have the bleaching materials at home and perform the treatments on your own, unsupervised. An hour of in-office treatment can produce the same results as one or two weeks of at-home tray-based whitening.

In a professional teeth whitening treatment, the whitening effect is seen immediately and is accomplished in just a few appointments (usually one) and usually the treatment costs more than the at-home teeth whitening products. Whitening professional products contain 15-50% hydrogen peroxide. At home products contain 3-10% hydrogen peroxide. This is why professional teeth whitening treatments can bleach teeth much more quickly and effectively.

The teeth whitening system that is best for you can depend on factors such as: the amount of time you have available, your temperament, and how much money you have to spend.

Here are some characteristics of professional and at-home teeth whitening systems...

Some advantages and disadvantages of at-home teeth whitening:

  • The dental patient must be capable of performing and complying with the whitening system's technique and instructions.

  • The person must have the time and inclination to perform the whitening treatments.

  • It can take some weeks or even months before the final results are seen with at-home systems.

  • At-home teeth whitening products usually cost less than professional teeth bleaching treatments.

Some advantages and disadvantages of professional teeth whitening:

  • The whitening effect is seen immediately.

  • The whitening is accomplished in just a few appointments (possibly even just one).

  • Professional teeth whitening usually costs more than at-home teeth whitening products.

How about over the counter Tooth Whitening and Dental Bleaching system or products?

Most of the whitening products (such as the strips) on the market will either take much longer (3 weeks) to obtain less/similar results and some products such as the whitening toothpastes or gels are just not effective. A lot of the whitening toothpastes are very abrasive and are meant to just get rid of surface stains and not to actually bleach the teeth. In addition due to their abrasiveness they may cause tooth sensitivity in the long run.

Professional, In-Office Teeth Whitening
in Melbourne City Area

These days, there are many ways to achieve a whiter, healthier looking smile. Professional teeth whitening costs can be minimal when compared to more complex treatment with porcelain restorations. Even people with sensitive teeth can take advantage of laser tooth whitening for a smile that dazzles. Many patients prefer tooth whitening to the take-home professional teeth whitening trays on the market. And, while costs for teeth whitening technology are usually more expensive, the instantaneous advantage of one-hour whitening is hard to resist.

-back to top-

The Teeth Whitening Procedure

The professional teeth whitening process begins with a minor cleaning and removal of any plaque along the gum line. Once this has been accomplished, its followed with a short preparation to isolate your lips and gums and peroxide based gel is applied to the teeth. This gel contains a professional strength formula that ensures the laser accomplishes the maximum possible amount of teeth whitening. Next, a special light is used to activate the gel. The process usually takes more than an hour for a full session of ZOOM or equivalent of 3 x 20 minutes per session or application, and whitens teeth by as many as 10 shades.
In extreme cases, the laser teeth whitening procedure may need to be repeated to address deep stains caused by medications such as tetracycline.
Teeth typically become at least six to ten shades whiter, sometimes more. You'll be amazed with the results. In most cases, teeth get even whiter the first few days after procedure.

Sensitive Teeth and Laser Tooth Whitening

One of the major side effects of tooth whitening is that it can increase the sensitivity of your teeth so it is advisable to avoid very hot and also very cold drinks or food shortly after your treatment. Even if you are one of the many people who have sensitive teeth, professional teeth whitening is still an option for a brighter smile. The tooth whitening process is usually accomplished in a single visit, reducing the need for repeated uses of the bleaching gel. This provides a great solution for people with sensitive teeth, and those who want instantaneous results.

Candidates For In-Office Teeth Whitening

Most people are potential candidates for the whitening procedure. However, there are a few exceptions:

It is not advisable to undertake whitening procedures under these circumstances

  • Age and pregnancy issues. Here whitening is not available for those under 16 years of age as the nerve of the teeth is large at this stage of life. It could render the nerve more sensitive or cause irritation. Pregnant or lactating women are also not advised to use this method.

  • Sensitive teeth and allergies. Those having sensitive teeth or gums, with receding or defective repairs need to see their dentist before engaging a whitening process. Allergies to peroxide will definitely not be favoured with a bleaching product

  • Gum disease, damaged teeth, cavities, and exposed roots. People with damaged teeth or worn enamel are not advised to use any bleaching method. A bleaching agent might enter any cavity and cause an inside damage. Hence it is necessary to treat such defects before launching into a whitening session. Bleaching does not work on roots also since they do not have the enamel layer on which bleaching acts.

  • Fillings, crowns and restored portions. Dental restorations sometimes make use of colored fillings or resin based products (crowns, veneers, bridges) and these do not whiten with bleaching. So an unequal whitening pattern may appear if bleaching is applied under these conditions. It is better to proceed with whitening before attempting any restoration exercise on the teeth. Best on your individual needs, we will advise on the method of treatment applicable in such cases, and confirming whether any importance is to be given to the bleaching or restoration exercise first.

  • Those expecting dramatic happenings may be disappointed with results below their expectations. People using harmful products like tobacco and wine need to be aware that the result may not stay for longer periods if they do not avoid such products. A more balanced expectation taking into consideration one's own lifestyle and hygiene pattern would give a more objective approach to the results' appreciation. A good standard indication is comparison of color of your teeth should be a little whiter than that of your eyes.

  • Heavily stained teeth. A light yellowish tint will definitely disappear under bleaching; less effective results would appear on brown tinted ones where as grayish or purple stained ones may not reveal any effect. Certain blue-gray stains which, are normally caused by tetracycline take even more time to whiten and require around 6 month of intensive care at the dentist's. Darker stains may be appropriately treated by other methods, for example: veneers, crowns, bonding.

-back to top-

Risk on Teeth Whitening:

1. Peroxide solutions have been used for many years as antiseptics in the mouth. They are also widely used for their teeth-whitening effects.

2. If tooth sensitivity develops, fluoride home care gel may be recommended for reducing sensitivity. If sensitivity persists-for more than 12 hours or is severe, please contact our office.

3. The whitening procedure can cause temporary inflammation and white spots on your gums or lips. This should resolve itself within 12 hours. If it persists. Please contact our office.

4. If you have teeth sensitivity, fillings that are breaking down, decay in your teeth, erosions of the teeth, or exposed root surfaces due to periodontal disease, the peroxide may have direct access to the affected areas. These conditions need correction prior to the whitening procedure. Please inform your dentist of such conditions prior to treatment.

5. The whitening procedure can be very effective at whitening the teeth, but will not change the colour of fillings or crown(s) already in or on your teeth. For aesthetic reasons, such fillings may need changing after the whitening procedure.

6. The whitening treatment plan has been reported not to be effective on some patients. Our office will provide our best efforts to whiten your teeth but lightening results cannot be guaranteed.

7. The In-office Teeth Whitening procedure can sometime caused discomfort during the treatment. If you believe your tolerance or threshold level to pain is low, we strongly suggest taking Analgesics One hour before your Teeth Whitening appointment to our office

Are there any side effects of Teeth Whitening?

Sensitivity and some discomfort during and after the treatment may occur with some patients. On rare occasions, minor tingling sensations are experienced immediately after the procedure, but always dissipate, these symptoms are only temporary and disappear within a few days. Using a sensitive toothpaste for 2 weeks prior to treatment can help prevent any sensitivity.
Analgesics before and after the procedure will manage the discomfort. It's strongly advised also to have the procedure few days to few weeks before any special occasions like Weddings, anniversaries or any special events or functions.

Is Teeth whitening safe?

Yes. Extensive research and clinical studies indicate that whitening teeth under the supervision of a dentist is safe. We consider tooth whitening to be the safest cosmetic dental procedure. As with any tooth whitening product, it is not recommended for children under 13 years of age and pregnant or lactating women.

-back to top-

Post-whitening care instructions

I. For 48 hours after the treatment the teeth are susceptible to stains from red wine, fruit berries, rich coloured sauces, dark coloured vegetables, coloured spices and coloured mouthwash etc. Eat only "white foods" such as chicken, fish, white wine etc. Smoking should also be avoided for during this period.

2. Keep your recall appointments with our office.

3. If you have any questions or concerns contact our office.

4. To keep your teeth looking their best, we recommend flossing, brushing twice daily with Whitening Toothpaste, and occasional touch-ups once a month or as needed with with the At-home teeth whitening treatment to achieve a long term, long lasting result

Guarantees? What are realistic expectations?

No one can really predict how much lighter your teeth will become. Every case is different. There are no guarantees as to the degree of whitening of your teeth.

1. The amount of whitening varies with the individual.

2. Additional whitening sessions and the use of ancillary whitening systems may be required to obtain desired results.

3. In some instances lightening is minimal or unapparent.

Typically, there is a two-shade improvement as seen on a dentist's shade guide. The success rate depends upon the type of stain involved and your compliance. Bleaching can only provide a shift in color from gray to a lighter shade of gray, for example. Bleaching does not lighten artificial materials such as resins, silicants, or porcelains.

The amount of Tooth or Teeth whitening varies from patient to patient and cannot be predicted or guaranteed.

But in general:

1. Yellow or brown teeth, surface stains, and uniformly darkened teeth are easier to whiten than grey or bluish teeth. Striped or spotted teeth are difficult to whiten.

2. The In-office Whitening System is a quick procedure that may or may not require additional whitening treatments in order to reach a desired lightened shade. Additional procedures or treatments could include take-home products or additional office visits.

How long will tooth whitening last?

Definitely this is not a lifetime result producing system.The answer to this squestion depends upon many factors such as diet, if you smoke, if you drink tea or coffee and what your oral hygiene program is like. Many patients choose to "touch-up" their teeth er 1 or 2 nights. "Touch-ups" are especially useful for patients that drink beverages that stain teeth,like coffee, tea, and colas

Are Amalgam-Type Fillings Safe?

Over the past several years, concerns have been raised about silver-colored fillings, otherwise called amalgams. Because amalgams contain the toxic substance mercury, some people think that amalgams are responsible for causing a number of diseases, including autism, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis.

The American Dental Association (ADA), the FDA, and numerous public health agencies say amalgams are safe, and that any link between mercury-based fillings and disease is unfounded. The causes of autism, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis remain unknown. Additionally, there is no solid, scientific evidence to back up the claim that if a person has amalgam fillings removed, he or she will be cured of these or any other diseases.

As recently as March of 2002, the FDA reconfirmed the safety of amalgams. Although amalgams do contain mercury, when they are mixed with other metals, such as silver, copper, tin, and zinc, they form a stable alloy that dentists have used for more than 100 years to fill and preserve hundreds of millions of decayed teeth. The National Institutes of Health has several large-scale studies currently under way to ultimately answer many of the questions raised about silver-colored amalgams. Results of these studies are expected to be released.

In addition, there has been concern over the release of a small amount of mercury vapor from these fillings, but according to the ADA, there is no scientific evidence that this small amount results in adverse health effects.

How Should I Care for My Teeth With Fillings?

To maintain your fillings, you should follow good oral hygiene practices – visiting your dentist regularly for cleanings, brushing with a fluoride-containing toothpaste, and flossing at least once daily. If your dentist suspects that a filling might be cracked or is "leaking" (when the sides of the filling don't fit tightly against the tooth, this allows debris and saliva to seep down between the filling and the tooth, which can lead to decay), he or she will take X-rays to assess the situation. If your tooth is extremely sensitive, if you feel a sharp edge, if you notice a crack in the filling, or if a piece of the filling is missing, call your dentist for an appointment.

Problems With Dental Fillings

Pain and Sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity following placement of a filling is fairly common. A tooth may be sensitive to pressure, air, sweet foods, or temperature. Usually, the sensitivity resolves on its own within a few weeks. During this time, avoid those things that are causing the sensitivity. Pain relievers are generally not required.

Contact your dentist if the sensitivity does not subside within 2 to 4 weeks or if your tooth is extremely sensitive. He or she may recommend you use a desensitizing toothpaste, may apply a desensitizing agent to the tooth, or possibly suggest a root canal procedure.

Pain around the fillings can also occur. If you experience pain when you bite, the filling is interfering with your bite. You will need to return to your dentist and have the filling reshaped. If you experience pain when your teeth touch, the pain The pain is likely caused by the touching of two different metal surfaces (for example, the silver amalgam in a newly filled tooth and a gold crown on another tooth with which it touches). This pain should resolve on its own within a short period of time.

If the decay was very deep to the pulp of the tooth, you may experience a "toothache-type" pain. This "toothache" response may indicate this tissue is no longer healthy. If this is the case, "root canal" treatment will be required.

Sometimes people experience what is known as referred pain -- pain or sensitivity in other teeth besides the one that received the filling. With this particular pain, there is likely nothing wrong with your teeth. The filled tooth is simply passing along "pain signals" it's receiving to other teeth. This pain should decrease on its own over 1 to 2 weeks.

Allergies

Allergic reactions to silver fillings are rare. Fewer than 100 cases have ever been reported, according to the ADA. In these rare circumstances, mercury or one of the metals used in an amalgam restoration is thought to trigger the allergic response. Symptoms of amalgam allergy are similar to those experienced in a typical skin allergy and include skin rashes and itching. Patients who suffer amalgam allergies typically have a medical or family history of allergies to metals. Once an allergy is confirmed, another restorative material can be used.

Deteriorating Fillings

Constant pressure from chewing, grinding or clenching can cause dental fillings to wear away, chip or crack. Although you may not be able to tell that your filling is wearing down, your dentist can identify weaknesses in your restorations during a regular check-up.

If the seal between the tooth enamel and the filling breaks down, food particles and decay-causing bacteria can work their way under the filling. You then run the risk of developing additional decay in that tooth. Decay that is left untreated can progress to infect the dental pulp and may cause an abscessed tooth.

If the filling is large or the recurrent decay is extensive, there may not be enough tooth structure remaining to support a replacement filling. In these cases, your dentist may need to replace the filling with a crown.

New fillings that fall out are probably the result of improper cavity preparation, contamination of the preparation prior to placement of the restoration or a fracture of the restoration from bite or chewing trauma. Older restorations will generally be lost due to decay or fracturing of the remaining tooth.

I have a Dental Cavity and what I need to know about Dental Fillings?

Fillings

To treat a cavity your dentist will remove the decayed portion of the tooth and then "fill" the area on the tooth where the decayed material once lived.

Fillings are also used to repair cracked or broken teeth and teeth that have been worn down from misuse (such as from nail-biting or tooth grinding).

What Steps Are Involved in Filling a Tooth?

First, the dentist will numb the area around the tooth to be worked on with a local anesthetic. Next, a drill, air abrasion instrument or laser will be used to remove the decayed area. The choice of instrument depends on the individual dentist's comfort level, training, and investment in the particular piece of equipment as well as location and extent of the decay.

Next, your dentist will probe or test the area during the decay removal process to determine if all the decay has been removed. Once the decay has been removed, your dentist will prepare the space for the filling by cleaning the cavity of bacteria and debris. If the decay is near the root, your dentist may first put in a liner made of glass ionomer, composite resin, or other material to protect the nerve. Generally, after the filling is in, your dentist will finish and polish it.

Several additional steps are required for tooth-colored fillings and are as follows. After your dentist has removed the decay and cleaned the area, the tooth-colored material is applied in layers. Next, a special light that "cures" or hardens each layer is applied. When the multilayering process is completed, your dentist will shape the composite material to the desired result, trim off any excess material and polish the final restoration.

What Types of Filling Materials Are Available?

Today, several dental filling materials are available. Teeth can be filled with gold; porcelain; silver amalgam (which consists of mercury mixed with silver, tin, zinc, and copper); or tooth-colored, plastic and glass materials called composite resin fillings. The location and extent of the decay, cost of filling material, patients' insurance coverage and your dentist's recommendation assist in determining the type of filling that will best address your needs.

Cast gold

Advantages:

1. Durability – lasts at least 10 to 15 years, usually longer; doesn't corrode

2. Strength – can withstand chewing forces

3. Aesthetics – some patients find gold more pleasing to the eye than silver, amalgam fillings

Disadvantages:

1. Expense – more than other materials; up to 10 times higher than cost of amalgam filings

2. Additional office visits – requires at least two office visits to place

3. Galvanic shock – a gold filling placed immediately next to a silver, amalgam filling can cause a sharp pain (galvanic shock) to occur. The interaction between the metals and saliva causes an electric current to occur – it's a rare occurrence, however

4. Aesthetics – most patients don't find any "colored" fillings to be an "eye-pleasing" advantage

Silver-fillings (Amalgams)

Advantages:

1. Durability – lasts at least 10 to 15 years and usually outlasts composite fillings

2. Strength – can withstand chewing forces

3. Expense – is less expensive than composite fillings

Disadvantages:

1. Poor aesthetics – fillings don't match the color of your natural teeth

2. Destruction of more tooth structure – healthy parts of the tooth must often be removed to make a space large enough to hold the amalgam filling

3. Discoloration – amalgam fillings can create a grayish hue to the surrounding tooth structure

4. Cracks and fractures – although all teeth expand and contract in the presence of hot and cold liquids, which ultimately can cause the tooth to crack or fracture, amalgam material – in comparison with other filling materials–may experience a wider degree of expansion and contraction and lead to a higher incidence of cracks and fractures

5. Allergic reactions – a small percentage of people, approximately 1%, are allergic to the mercury present in amalgam restorations

Tooth-colored composite fillings

Advantages:

1. Aesthetics – the shade/color of the composites can be closely matched to the color of existing teeth; is particularly well suited for use in front teeth or visible parts of teeth

2. Bonding to tooth structure – composite fillings actually chemically bond to tooth structure, providing further support to the tooth

3. Versatility in uses – in addition to use as a filling material for decay, composite fillings can also be used to repair chipped, broken or worn teeth

4. Tooth-sparing preparation – sometimes less tooth structure needs to be removed compared with amalgams when removing decay and preparing for the filling

Disadvantages:

1. Lack of durability – composite fillings wear out sooner than amalgams (lasting at least 5 years compared with at least 10 to 15 for amalgams); in addition, they may not last as long as amalgams under the pressure of chewing and particularly if used as the filling material for large cavities

2. Increased chair time – because of the process to apply the composite material, these fillings can take up to 20 minutes longer than amalgams to place

3. Additional visits – if composites are used for inlays or onlays, more than one office visit may be required

4. Chipping – depending on location, composite materials can chip off the tooth

5. Expense – composite fillings can cost up to twice the cost of amalgams

-back to top-

In addition to tooth-colored, composite resin fillings, two other tooth-colored fillings exist–ceramics and glass ionomer.

Other

1. Ceramics, which are made most often of porcelain, are more resistant to staining than composite resin material but are also more abrasive. This material generally lasts more than 15 years and can cost as much as gold.

2. Glass ionomer is made of acrylic and a specific type of glass material. This material is most commonly used for fillings below the gum line and for fillings in young children (drilling is still required). Glass ionomers release fluoride, which can help protect the tooth from further decay. However, this material is weaker than composite resin and is more susceptible to wear and prone to fracture. Glass ionomer generally lasts 5 years or less with costs comparable to composite resin.

What Are Indirect Fillings?

Indirect fillings are similar to composite or tooth-colored fillings except that they are made in a dental laboratory and require two visits before being placed. Indirect fillings are considered when not enough tooth structure remains to support a filling but the tooth is not so severely damaged that it needs a crown.

During the first visit, decay or an old filling is removed. An impression is taken to record the shape of the tooth being repaired and the teeth around it. The impression is sent to a dental laboratory that will make the indirect filling. A temporary filling (described below) is placed to protect the tooth while your restoration is being made. During the second visit, the temporary filling is removed, and the dentist will check the fit of the indirect restoration. Provided the fit is acceptable, it will be permanently cemented into place.

There are two types of indirect fillings – inlays and onlays.

  • Inlays are similar to fillings but the entire work lies within the cusps (bumps) on the chewing surface of the tooth.

  • Onlays are more extensive than inlays, covering one or more cusps. Onlays are sometimes called partial crowns.

Inlays and onlays are more durable and last much longer than traditional fillings – up to 30 years. They can be made of tooth-colored composite resin, porcelain or gold. Inlays and onlays weaken the tooth structure, but do so to a much lower extent than traditional fillings.

Another type of inlay and onlay - direct inlays and onlays - follow the same processes and procedures as the indirect, the difference is that direct inlays and onlays are made in the dental office and can be placed in one visit. The type of inlay or onlay used depends on how much sound tooth structure remains and consideration of any cosmetic concerns.

What's a Temporary Filling and Why Would I Need One?

Temporary fillings are used under the following circumstances:

1. For fillings that require more than one appointment – for example, before placement of gold fillings and for certain filling procedures (called indirect fillings) that use composite materials

2. Following a root canal

3. To allow a tooth's nerve to "settle down" if the pulp became irritated

4. If emergency dental treatment is needed (such as to address a toothache)

Temporary fillings are just that; they are not meant to last. They usually fall out, fracture, or wear out within 1 month. Be sure to contact your dentist to have your temporary filling replaced with a permanent one. If you don't, your tooth could become infected or you could have other complications.

Bad Breath help and treatment

BAD BREATH OR HALITOSIS

What Is It?

Bad breath is breath that has an unpleasant odor. It's also known as halitosis. This odor can strike from time to time, or it can be long-lasting, depending on the cause.
Millions of bacteria live in the mouth, particularly on the back of the tongue. In many people, they are the primary causes of bad breath. The mouth's warm, moist conditions are ideal for the growth of these bacteria. Most bad breath is caused by something in the mouth.
Some types of bad breath are considered to be fairly normal. They usually are not health concerns. One example is "morning mouth." This occurs because of changes in your mouth while you sleep. During the day, saliva washes away decaying food and odors. The body makes less saliva at night. Your mouth becomes dry, and dead cells stick to your tongue and to the inside of your cheeks. When bacteria use these cells for food, they produce a foul odor.

In addition, bad breath can be caused by the following:

  • Poor dental hygiene - Infrequent or improper brushing and flossing, which allows bits of food to decay inside the mouth

  • Infections in the mouth - Periodontal (gum) disease

  • Respiratory tract infections - Throat, sinus or lung infections

  • External agents - Garlic, onions, coffee, cigarette smoking, chewing tobacco

  • Dry mouth (xerostomia) - Caused by salivary gland problems, medicines or "mouth breathing"

  • Systemic (bodywide) illnesses - Diabetes, liver disease, kidney disease, lung disease, sinus disease, reflux disease and others

  • Psychiatric illness - Some people may believe they have bad breath, but others do not notice it. This is referred to as "pseudohalitosis."

Symptoms

You may not always know that you have bad breath. That's because odor-detecting cells in the nose eventually get used to the smell. Other people may notice and react by recoiling as you speak.

Other symptoms depend on the underlying cause of bad breath:


Poor dental hygiene - Teeth are coated with film or plaque. You may have food trapped between the teeth and pale or swollen gums.

Infections in the mouth - Symptoms depend on the type of infection. They can include:

  • Red or swollen gums that may bleed easily, especially after brushing or flossing

  • Pus between teeth or a pocket of pus (abscess) at the base of a tooth

  • Loose teeth or a change in how a denture fits

  • Painful, open sores on the tongue or gums

Respiratory tract infections - Sore throat, swollen lymph nodes ("swollen glands") in the neck, fever, stuffy nose, a greenish or yellowish nasal discharge, a mucus-producing cough

External agents - Cigarette stains on fingers and teeth, a uniform yellow "coffee stain" on teeth

Dry mouth - Symptoms may include:

  • Difficulty swallowing dry foods

  • Difficulty speaking for a long time because of mouth dryness

  • Burning in the mouth

  • An unusually high number of cavities

  • Dry eyes (in Sjögren's syndrome)

Systemic (bodywide) illnesses - Symptoms of diabetes, lung disease, kidney failure or liver disease

Diagnosis

A dentist or physician may notice bad breath during an office visit. Sometimes, the smell of the patient's breath may suggest a likely cause for the problem. For example, "fruity" breath may be a sign of uncontrolled diabetes. A urine-like smell, especially in a person who is at high risk of kidney disease, can sometimes indicate kidney failure.

Your dentist will review your medical history for conditions that can cause bad breath and for medicines that can cause dry mouth. Your dentist also will ask you about your diet, personal habits (smoking, chewing tobacco) and any symptoms. He or she also will ask who noticed the bad breath and when.

Your dentist will examine your teeth, gums, mouth and salivary glands. He or she also will feel your head and neck and will evaluate your breath when you exhale from your nose and from your mouth.

Your dentist may refer you to your family physician if a bodywide illness is the most likely cause. In severe cases of gum disease, your dentist may suggest that you see a periodontist (dentist who specializes in gum problems).

You will need diagnostic tests if the doctor suspects a lung infection, diabetes, kidney disease, liver disease or Sjögren's syndrome. The type of tests you get depends on the suspected illness. You may get blood tests, urine tests, X-rays of the chest or sinuses, or other tests.

Expected Duration

How long bad breath lasts depends on its cause. For example, when the problem results from poor dental hygiene, proper dental care will begin to freshen the mouth right away. You'll have even better results after a few days of regular brushing and flossing. Periodontal disease and tooth abscess also respond quickly to proper dental treatment.

Bad breath caused by chronic sinusitis may keep coming back, especially if it is caused by a structural abnormality of the sinuses.

Bad breath that results from a systemic illness may be a long-term problem. It often can be controlled with proper medical care.

PREVENTION

Maintaining good oral health is essential to reducing bad breath. Schedule regular dental visits for a professional cleaning and checkup. If you think you have constant bad breath, keep a log of the foods you eat and make a list of medications you take. Some medications may play a role in creating mouth odors. Let your dentist know if you've had any surgery or illness since your last appointment.

Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste to remove food debris and plaque. Brush your tongue, too. Once a day, use floss or an interdental cleaner to clean between teeth.

Mouthwashes are generally cosmetic and do not have a long-lasting effect on bad breath. If you must constantly use a breath freshener to hide unpleasant mouth odor, see your dentist. If you need extra help in controlling plaque, your dentist may recommend using a special antimicrobial mouth rinse. A fluoride mouth rinse, used along with brushing and flossing, can help prevent tooth decay.

You also can combat bad breath by drinking plenty of water every day to help your body make saliva. An occasional swish of the mouth with water can loosen bits of food. Other products can help you keep breath fresh and prevent plaque from forming. They include:

  • Sugar-free gum

  • Sugarless breath mints

  • Raw carrots

  • Celery

The treatment of bad breath depends on its cause.

Call your dentist promptly if you have bad breath with loose teeth or painful, swollen gums that bleed easily. Also, call your doctor if you have bad breath along with any of the following symptoms:

  • Fever

  • Sore throat

  • Postnasal drip

  • Discolored nasal discharge

  • Cough that produces mucus

Even if you have none of these symptoms, call your dentist or physician if your bad breath continues despite a good diet and proper dental hygiene.


Bad breath may be the sign of a medical disorder, such as a local infection in the respiratory tract, chronic sinusitis, postnasal drip, chronic bronchitis, diabetes, gastrointestinal disturbance, liver or kidney ailment. If your dentist determines that your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your family doctor or a specialist to determine the cause of bad breath.

Risk Factors of Oral Cancer

Risk Factors of Oral Cancer

Research shows that there are risk factors (something that increases an individual's chances of developing a disease) for oral cancer, just like any other form of cancer. These include tobacco, alcohol, sun, and personal history of head and neck cancer.

Tobacco

Tobacco use is present in the majority of people who develop oral cancer. Smoking cigarettes, cigars, or pipes; chewing tobacco; and dipping snuff are all linked to oral cancer. The use of other tobacco products may also increase the risk of oral cancer. Individuals who use tobacco heavily for an extended period of time are most at risk of developing oral cancer.

Alcohol

People who drink are more likely to develop oral cancer than people who don't. The heavier the consumption of alcohol, the more likely the individual is to develop oral cancer.

Sun

Sun exposure can case lip and mouth cancer. For this reason, it is important to use chapstick with a sunscreen in it.

Personal History of Head and Neck Cancer

People who have had head or neck cancer before are likely to develop oral or throat cancer. It is also likely to re-occur if other risk factors are present.
With any of the risk factors, if the individual also smokes, the chances increase. 75% of oral cancer victims smoke heavily, drink heavily, or a combination of the two. Also, quitting smoking reduces the risk of oral cancer.

What are the warning signs of oral cancer?

Oral cancer occurs most often in people who are 40 years old or older. It is usually difficult to detect in its early stages, which is when oral cancer can be treated most effectively. That said, it is important to contact our offices if you notice any unusual white or red patches on your tongue or any oral sores that do not heal within two weeks. It is important for patients who wear dentures to schedule regular dental exams so that we can screen for any warning signs of cancer.

Dealing With Sensitive Teeth

Dealing With Sensitive Teeth

If you have sensitive teeth, you understand how irritating and inconvenient they can be. Simply drinking a cold glass of water, having a scoop of ice cream, or taking a sip of hot chocolate can send jolts of pain through your mouth. While many people feel that sensitive teeth are a condition that they have no choice but to put up with, the truth is that sensitive teeth can be caused by a variety of dental factors, and, as always, should be discussed with your dentist for treatment options.

What causes sensitive teeth?

Teeth become sensitive when the nerves and cells inside them get exposed to high or low temperatures or pressure. In healthy teeth, these nerves are protected by a layer of enamel, the hardest and toughest substance in the body. The enamel shields the nerves from outside sensations and allows you to eat and drink hot or cold foods without discomfort. However, sometimes, due to damage to tooth enamel, receding gums, or other factors, a porous layer under the enamel, called dentin, becomes exposed. Because dentin is full of tiny tubules, sensations including, but not limited to, heat, cold, and pressure, are transmitted directly to the nerves inside the tooth, causing pain and sensitivity.

What can I do about my sensitive teeth?

In addition to maintaining proper brushing and flossing habits and being conscientious about your overall dental health, consulting your dentist is a good first step to take. Your dentist will able to determine the exact cause of your sensitive teeth and prescribe an appropriate solution. For example, if your tooth has a cavity that is contributing to sensitivity, your dentist can clean out and fill in the cavity to remedy the problem. Another possible solution that your dentist may suggest is the use of special desensitizing toothpaste. This special toothpaste helps dull any sensation transmitted to the nerves in your tooth, thus reducing pain and sensitivity. Your dentist may also decide to apply a fluoride gel designed to fortify and strengthen worn or damaged tooth enamel, or administer a sealant to protect a tooth root exposed by receding gums.

Causes of Sensitive Teeth

Sensitive teeth, teeth that are sensitive to cold or heat, affect numerous people. It can be an extremely uncomfortable situation as individuals' teeth are constantly coming into contact with hot and cold foods and beverages. The causes of sensitive teeth are varied and diverse.

The Causes:

  • Reduced tooth enamel. Enamel is the hardest and mineralized substance in the body. It is one of the four major tissues which make up the tooth. This substance can be eroded due to overly hard tooth brushing, eating too many acidic foods, and drinking carbonated beverages.

  • Tooth decay. Tooth decay is a destructive process that causes the decalcification of the tooth's enamel. This causes the tooth to be more sensitive.

  • Tooth abscess. An abscess is a pus-filled structure. In a tooth, it is a pus-filled structure caused by a tooth infection. If it is left untreated, a tooth abscess infection can spread to other areas of the body. These are generally the result of poor dental health.

  • Dental abscess. A dental abscess is very similar to a tooth abscess except the infection and pus-filled lump are located in the bone or soft tissues of the jaw.

  • Recent dental work

  • Gum disease. Gum disease, or periodontitis, is an infection of the gums and the bone that holds the teeth. If it is a continuing problem, the gum may pull away from the tooth leaving the root exposed and sensitive to heat and cold.

  • Pyorrhea Alveolarsis. Pyorrhea Alveolarsis is a chronic case of periodontits and includes inflammation of the tooth socket.

  • Bulimia nervosa. The acid brought up from the stomach when an individual with bulimia nervosa purges food wears away the enamel of the teeth resulting in reduced tooth enamel.

Gum Problems

Gum problems and the Symptoms of Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal disease may progress painlessly, producing few obvious signs, even in the late stages of the disease. Although the symptoms of periodontal disease often are subtle, the condition is not entirely without warning signs. Certain symptoms may point to some form of the disease. They include:

  • Gums that bleed during and after tooth brushing

  • Red, swollen, or tender gums

  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste in the mouth

  • Receding gums

  • Formation of deep pockets between teeth and gums

  • Loose or shifting teeth

  • Changes in the way teeth fit together upon biting down, or in the fit of partial dentures.

Even if you don't notice any symptoms, you may still have some degree of gum disease. In some people, gum disease may affect only certain teeth, such as the molars. Only a dentist or a periodontist can recognize and determine the progression of gum disease.

How Does My Dentist Diagnose Periodontal Disease?

During a periodontal exam, your dentist or periodontist typically checks for these things:

  • Gum bleeding, swelling, firmness, and pockets (the space between the gum and tooth; the larger and deeper the pocket, the more severe the disease)

  • Teeth movement and sensitivity and proper teeth alignment

  • Your jawbone to help detect the breakdown of bone surrounding your teeth

How Is Periodontal Disease Treated?

The goals of periodontal treatment are to promote reattachment of healthy gums to teeth; reduce swelling, the depth of pockets, and the risk of infection; and to stop disease progression. Treatment options depend on the stage of disease, how you may have responded to earlier treatments, and your overall health. Options range from nonsurgical therapies that control bacterial growth to surgery to restore supportive tissues. A full description of the various treatment options is provided in Gum Disease Treatments.

How Can Gingivitis Be Prevented?

Gingivitis can be reversed in nearly all cases when proper plaque control is practiced. Proper plaque control consists of professional cleanings at least twice a year and daily brushing and flossing. Brushing eliminates plaque from the surfaces of the teeth that can be reached; flossing removes food particles and plaque from in between the teeth and under the gum line.

Other health and lifestyle changes that will decrease the risk, severity, and speed of gum disease development include:

  • Stop smoking. Tobacco use is a significant risk factor for development of periodontitis. Smokers are seven times more likely to get periodontitis than nonsmokers, and smoking can lower the chances of success of some treatments.

  • Reduce stress. Stress may make it difficult for your body's immune system to fight off infection.

  • Maintain a well-balanced diet. Proper nutrition helps your immune system fight infection. Eating foods with antioxidant properties, for example, those containing vitamin E or vitamin C (vitamin E-containing foods include vegetable oils, nuts, green leafy vegetables; vitamin C-containing foods include citrus fruits, broccoli, potatoes) can help your body repair damaged tissue.

  • Avoid clenching and grinding your teeth. These actions may put excess force on the supporting tissues of the teeth and could increase the rate at which these tissues are destroyed.

Despite following good oral hygiene practices and making other healthy lifestyle choices, the American Academy of Periodontology says that up to 30% of the Americans may be genetically susceptible to gum disease. And those who are genetically predisposed may be up to six times more likely to develop some form of gum disease. If anyone in your family has gum disease, it may mean that you are at greater risk as well. If you are more susceptible to gum disease, your dentist or periodontist may recommend more frequent check-ups, cleanings, and treatments to better manage the condition.

Is Periodontal Disease Linked to Other Health Problems?

According to the CDC, researchers have uncovered potential links between periodontal disease and other serious health conditions. In people with healthy immune systems, the bacteria in the mouth that makes its way into the bloodstream is usually harmless. But under certain circumstances, the CDC says these microorganisms are associated with health problems such as stroke and heart disease. Diabetes is not only a risk factor for periodontal disease, but periodontal disease may make diabetes worse.

Teeth Grinding

Teeth Grinding (Bruxism)

Most people probably grind and clench their teeth from time to time. Occasional teeth grinding, medically called bruxism, does not usually cause harm, but when teeth grinding occurs on a regular basis the teeth can be damaged and other complications can arise.

Why Do People Grind Their Teeth?

Although teeth grinding can be caused by stress and anxiety, it often occurs during sleep and is more likely caused by an abnormal bite or missing or crooked teeth.

How Do I Find Out if I Grind My Teeth?

Because grinding often occurs during sleep, most people are unaware that they grind their teeth. However, a dull, constant headache or sore jaw is a telltale symptom of bruxism. Many times people learn that they grind their teeth by their loved one who hears the grinding at night.

If you suspect you may be grinding your teeth, talk to your dentist. He or she can examine your mouth and jaw for signs of bruxism, such as jaw tenderness and abnormalities in your teeth.

Why Is Teeth Grinding Harmful?

In some cases, chronic teeth grinding can result in a fracturing, loosening, or loss of teeth. The chronic grinding may wear their teeth down to stumps. When these events happen, bridges, crowns, root canals, implants, partial dentures, and even complete dentures may be needed.

Not only can severe grinding damage teeth and result in tooth loss, it can also affect your jaws, result in hearing loss, cause or worsen TMD/TMJ, and even change the appearance of your face.

What Can I Do to Stop Grinding My Teeth?

Your dentist can fit you with a mouth guard to protect your teeth during sleep.

If stress is causing you to grind your teeth, ask your doctor or dentist about options to reduce your stress. Attending stress counseling, starting an exercise program, seeing a physical therapist or obtaining a prescription for muscle relaxants are among some of the options that may be offered.

Other tips to help you stop teeth grinding include:

· Avoid or cut back on foods and drinks that contain caffeine, such as colas, chocolate, and coffee.

  • Avoid alcohol. Grinding tends to intensify after alcohol consumption.

  • Do not chew on pencils or pens or anything that is not food. Avoid chewing gum as it allows your jaw muscles to get more used to clenching and makes you more likely to grind your teeth.

  • Train yourself not to clench or grind your teeth. If you notice that you clench or grind during the day, position the tip of your tongue between your teeth. This practice trains your jaw muscles to relax.

  • Relax your jaw muscles at night by holding a warm washcloth against your cheek in front of your earlobe.

Do Children Grind Their Teeth?

The problem of teeth grinding is not limited to adults. Approximately 15% to 33% of children grind their teeth. Children who grind their teeth tend to do so at two peak times – when their baby teeth emerge and when their permanent teeth come in. Most children lose the teeth grinding habit after these two sets of teeth have come in more fully.

Most commonly, children grind their teeth during sleep rather than during waking hours. No one knows exactly why children grind their teeth but considerations include improperly aligned teeth or irregular contact between upper and lower teeth, illnesses and other medical conditions (such as nutritional deficiencies, pinworm, allergies, endocrine disorders) and psychological factors including anxiety and stress.

Grinding of the baby teeth rarely results in problems. However, teeth grinding can cause jaw pain, headaches, wear on the teeth and TMD. Consult your dentist if your child's teeth look worn or if your child complains of tooth sensitivity or pain.

Specific tips to help a child stop grinding his or her teeth include:

· Decrease your child's stress, especially just before bed.

  • Try massage and stretching exercises to relax the muscles.

  • Make sure your child's diet includes plenty of water. Dehydration may be linked to teeth grinding.

  • Ask your dentist to monitor your child's teeth if he or she is a grinder.

No intervention is usually required with preschool-age children. However, older children may need temporary crowns or other methods, such as a night guard, to prevent the grinding.

Oral Cancer - Detection, Prevention, treatment

Cancer is defined as the uncontrollable growth of cells that invade and cause damage to surrounding tissue. Oral cancer appears as a growth or sore in the mouth that does not go away. Oral cancer, which includes cancers of the lips, tongue, cheeks, floor of the mouth, hard and soft palate, sinuses, and pharynx (throat), can be life threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

What Are the Symptoms of Oral Cancer?

The most common signs of oral cancer include:

  • Swellings/thickenings, lumps or bumps, rough spots/crusts/or eroded areas on the lips, gums or other areas inside the mouth.

  • The development of velvety white, red, or speckled (white and red) patches in the mouth.

  • Unexplained bleeding in the mouth.

  • Unexplained numbness, loss of feeling, or pain/tenderness in any area of the face, mouth, or neck.

  • Persistent sores on the face, neck, or mouth that bleed easily and do not heal within 2 weeks.

  • A soreness or feeling that something is caught in the back of the throat.

  • Difficulty chewing or swallowing, speaking, or moving the jaw or tongue.

  • Hoarseness, chronic sore throat, or change in voice.

  • Ear pain.

  • A change in the way your teeth or dentures fit together.

  • Dramatic weight loss.

If you notice any of these changes, contact your dentist or health care professional immediately for a professional examination.

-back to top-

Who Gets Oral Cancer?

According to the American Cancer Society, men face twice the risk of developing oral cancer as women, and men who are over age 50 face the greatest risk. In fact, oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer among men.

Risk factors for the development of oral cancer include:

  • Smoking. Cigarette, cigar, or pipe smokers are six times more likely than nonsmokers to develop oral cancers.

  • Smokeless tobacco users. Users of dip, snuff, or chewing tobacco products are 50 times more likely to develop cancers of the cheek, gums and lining of the lips.

  • Excessive consumption of alcohol. Oral cancers are about six times more common in drinkers than in nondrinkers.

  • Family history of cancer.

  • Excessive sun exposure, especially at a young age.

It is important to note that over 25% of all oral cancers occur in people who do not smoke and who only drink alcohol occasionally.

What Is the Outlook for People With Oral Cancer?

The overall 1-year survival rate for patients with all stages of oral cavity and pharynx cancers is 81%. The 5- and 10-year survival rates are 56% and 41%, respectively.

How Is Oral Cancer Diagnosed?

As part of your routine dental examination, your dentist will conduct an oral cancer screening exam. More specifically, your dentist will feel for any lumps or irregular tissue changes in your neck, head, face, and oral cavity. When examining your mouth, your dentist will look for any sores or discolored tissue as well as check for any signs and symptoms mentioned above.

Your dentist may perform an oral brush biopsy if he or she sees tissue in your mouth that looks suspicious. This test is painless and involves taking a small sample of the tissue and analyzing it for abnormal cells. Alternatively, if the tissue looks more suspicious, your dentist may recommend a scalpel biopsy. This procedure usually requires local anesthesia and may be performed by your dentist or a specialist. These tests are necessary to detect oral cancer early, before it has had a chance to progress and spread.

How Is Oral Cancer Treated?

Oral cancer is treated the same way many other cancers are treated; that is with surgery to remove the cancerous growth followed by radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy (drug treatments) to destroy any remaining cancer cells.

What Can I Do to Prevent Oral Cancer?

  • Don't smoke or use any tobacco products and drink alcohol in moderation (and refrain from binge drinking).

  • Eat a well balanced diet.

  • Limit your exposure to the sun. Repeated exposure increases the risk of cancer on the lip, especially the lower lip. When in the sun, use UV-A/B-blocking sun protective lotions on your skin as well as your lips.

You can take an active role in detecting oral cancer early, should it occur by doing the following:

  • Conduct a self exam at least once a month. Using a bright light and a mirror, look and feel your lips and front of your gums. Tilt your head back and look at and feel the roof of your mouth. Pull your checks out to view the inside of your mouth, the lining of your cheeks, and the back gums. Pull out your tongue and look at all surfaces; examine the floor of your mouth. Look at the back of your throat. Feel for lumps or enlarged lymph nodes in both sides of your neck and under your lower jaw. Call your dentist's office immediately if you notice any changes in the appearance of your mouth or any of the signs and symptoms mentioned above.

  • See your dentist on a regular schedule. Even though you may be conducting frequent self exams, sometimes dangerous spots or sores in the mouth can be very tiny and difficult to see on your own. The American Cancer Society recommends oral cancer screening exams every 3 years for persons over age 20 and annually for those over age 40. During your next dental appointment, ask your dentist to perform an oral exam. Early detection can improve the chance of successful treatment.

Abscessed Tooth

An abscessed tooth is a painful infection at the root of a tooth or between the gum and a tooth. It's most commonly caused by severe tooth decay. Other causes of tooth abscess are trauma to the tooth, such as when it is broken or chipped, and gingivitis or gum disease.

These problems can cause openings in the tooth enamel, which allows bacteria to infect the center of the tooth (called the pulp). The infection may also spread from the root of the tooth to the bones supporting the tooth.

What Are the Symptoms of an Abscessed Tooth?

A toothache that is severe and continuous and results in gnawing or throbbing pain or sharp or shooting pain are common symptoms of an abscessed tooth. Other symptoms may include:

  • Fever

  • Pain when chewing

  • Sensitivity of the teeth to hot or cold

  • Bitter taste in the mouth

  • Foul smell to the breath

  • Swollen neck glands

  • General discomfort, uneasiness, or ill feeling

  • Redness and swelling of the gums

  • Swollen area of the upper or lower jaw

  • An open, draining sore on the side of the gum

If the root of the tooth dies as a result of infection, the toothache may stop. However, this doesn't mean the infection has healed; the infection remains active and continues to spread and destroy tissue. Therefore, if you experience any of the above listed symptoms, it is important to see a dentist even if the pain subsides.

How Is an Abscessed Tooth Diagnosed?

Your dentist will probe your teeth with a dental instrument. If you have an abscessed tooth, you will feel pain when the tooth is tapped by your dentist's probe. Your dentist will also ask you if your pain increases when you bite down or when you close your mouth tightly. In addition, your dentist may suspect an abscessed tooth because your gums may be swollen and red.

Your dentist may also take X-rays to look for erosion of the bone around the abscess.

How Is an Abscessed Tooth Treated?

Strategies to eliminate the infection, preserve the tooth, and prevent complications are the goals of treatment.

To eliminate infection, the abscess may need to be drained. Achieving drainage may be done through the tooth by a procedure known as a root canal. Root canal surgery may also be recommended to remove any diseased root tissue after the infection has subsided. Then, a crown may be placed over the tooth.

The tooth may also be extracted, allowing drainage through the socket.

Finally, a third way to drain the abscess would be by incision into the swollen gum tissue.

Antibiotics are prescribed to help fight the infection. To relieve the pain and discomfort associated with an abscessed tooth, warm salt-water rinses and over-the-counter pain-reducing medication like ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) can be used.

The inflammation and pain of abscesses can be relieved with a low-level laser, making the patient more comfortable to receive the injection in a more painless way.

Can an Abscessed Tooth Be Prevented?

Following good oral hygiene practices can reduce the risk of developing a tooth abscess. Also, if your teeth experience trauma (for example, become loosened or chipped), seek prompt dental attention.

Tooth Ache Help!

A toothache is a pain in or around a tooth that may be caused by:

  • Tooth decay

  • Abscessed tooth

  • Tooth fracture

  • A damaged filling

  • Repetitive motions, such as chewing gum or grinding teeth

  • Infected gums

Symptoms may include:

  • Tooth pain that may be sharp, throbbing, or constant. In some people, pain results only when pressure is applied to the tooth.

  • Swelling around the tooth

  • Fever or headache

  • Foul-tasting drainage from the infected tooth

When Should I See a Dentist?

See your dentist as soon as possible if:

  • You have a toothache that lasts longer than 1 or 2 days

  • Your toothache is severe

  • You have a fever, earache, or pain upon opening your mouth wide

Proper identification and treatment of dental infections is important to prevent its spread to other parts of the face and skull and possibly even to the bloodstream.

What Happens During the Dental Appointment?

Your dentist will obtain your medical history and conduct a physical exam. He or she will ask you questions about the pain, such as when the pain started, how severe it is, where the pain is located, what makes the pain worse, and what makes it better. Your dentist will examine your mouth, teeth, gums, jaws, tongue, throat, sinuses, ears, nose, and neck. X-rays may be taken as well as other tests, depending on what your dentist suspects is causing your toothache.

What Treatments Are Available?

Treatment depends on the cause of your toothache. If a cavity is causing the toothache, your dentist will fill the cavity or possibly extract the tooth, if necessary. A root canal might need to be performed if the cause of the toothache is determined to be an infection of the tooth's nerve. Bacteria that have worked their way into the inner aspects of the tooth cause such an infection. An antibiotic may be prescribed if there is fever or swelling of the jaw. Phototherapy with a cold laser may be used to reduce the pain and inflammation associated with the toothache.

How Can Toothaches Be Prevented?

Since most toothaches are the result of tooth decay, following good oral hygiene practices can prevent toothaches. Good oral hygiene practices consist of brushing regularly with a fluoride-containing toothpaste, flossing once daily, and seeing your dentist twice a year for professional cleaning. In addition to these practices, eat foods low in sugar and ask your dentist about sealants and fluoride applications.

Tooth Decay Prevention

Tooth decay is the destruction of tooth structure and can affect both the enamel (the outer coating of the tooth) and the dentin layer of the tooth.

Tooth decay occurs when foods containing carbohydrates (sugars and starches) such as breads, cereals, milk, soda, fruits, cakes, or candy are left on the teeth. Bacteria that live in the mouth digest these foods, turning them into acids. The bacteria, acid, food debris, and saliva combine to form plaque, which clings to the teeth. The acids in plaque dissolve the enamel surface of the teeth, creating holes in the teeth called cavities, or caries

To prevent tooth decay:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with a fluoride-containing toothpaste. Preferably, brush after each meal and especially before going to bed.

  • Clean between your teeth daily with dental floss or interdental cleaners, such as the Oral-B Interdental Brush, Reach Stim-U-Dent, or Sulcabrush.

  • Eat nutritious and balanced meals and limit snacks. Avoid carbohydrates such as candy, pretzels and chips, which can remain on the tooth surface. If sticky foods are eaten, brush your teeth soon afterwards.

  • Check with your dentist Get to Know Use of supplemental fluoride, which strengthens your teeth.

  • Ask your dentist about dental sealants (a plastic protective coating) applied to the chewing surfaces of your back teeth (molars) to protect them from decay.

  • Drink fluoridated water. At least a pint of fluoridated water each day is needed to protect children from tooth decay.

  • Visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and oral examination.

Researchers are developing new means to prevent tooth decay. One study found that a chewing gum that contains the sweetener xylitol temporarily retarded the growth of bacteria that cause tooth decay. In addition, several materials that slowly release fluoride over time, which will help prevent further decay, are being explored. These materials would be placed between teeth or in pits and fissures of teeth. Toothpastes and mouth rinses that can reverse and "heal" early cavities are also being studied

Financial Strategies to keep you smiling

Thank you for choosing our dental practice for your care. As our patient, we are committed to you and your treatment. We will do everything we can to ensure that you receive personalized care and that your experience with our office surpasses anything you have ever experienced with any other dental office. We are proud that our fees reflect the time as well as the overall quality of care and service that we provide in our practice.

However, we know that people have different financial position and different needs in fulfilling their financial obligations. That's why as well as offering the usual payment options, when the cost of anticipated dental work exceeds what you would like to place on your credit card or pay out of pocket, financing may be a better option.. We are pleased to offer several financing options or payment solutions to meet your needs and make routine dental care or a complete smile makeover more comfortable and affordable.

The payment plan enables our patients begin with their treatment immediately - then pay the cost of their treatment spread over time. It is an excellent payment option for elective cosmetic and/or emergency or general dental procedures.

Dental Emergency and Procedures - How to Manage Dental Emergencies

TOOTHACHE
Rinse the mouth with warm water to clean it out. Use dental floss to remove any food that might be trapped between the teeth. Never place an aspirin tablet on the gum beside the aching tooth. If you can see a definite hole, a small ball of cotton wool dipped in oil of cloves, squeezed almost dry and placed in the hole should help. See your dentist as soon as possible.

ABSCESS ON THE TOOTH
If you have a severe throbbing pain and the tooth feels as though it is raised out of the socket and is loose, try using a mouthwash consisting of a teaspoonful of salt in a glass of warm water. Hold each mouthful for about one minute and repeat the procedure 3 times daily. Never put heat on the outside of the face. See your dentist ASAP.

KNOCKED OUT TOOTH
If the tooth is dirty, rinse it gently in running cold tap water holding the crown (or the part of the tooth visible in the mouth). Do not scrub it or remove any attached tissue fragments. Gently insert the tooth in its socket or suck on it or place in the cheek or under the tongue. If this not possible, place the tooth in a cup of milk or in a cup of cool water or placed the tooth on a plastic wrap or wet towel. Go immediately to your dentist within 30 minutes is possible. Don't forget to bring the tooth.

BROKEN TOOTH
Gently clean dirt from the injured area with warm water. Place cold compress on the face, in the area of injured tooth, to decrease swelling. Go to dentist immediately.

BITTEN TONGUE OR LIP
Apply direct pressure to the bleeding area with a clean cloth. If swelling is present, apply cold compress. If bleeding does not stop, go to a hospital emergency room.

PROBLEMS WITH BRACES AND RETAINERS
If a wire is causing irritation, cover the end with a small cotton ball, beeswax or piece of gauze, until you can get to the dentist. If a wire gets stuck in the cheek, tongue or gum tissue, do not attempt to remove it. Go to your dentist immediately. If an appliance becomes loose or if it breaks off, take the appliance and the piece and go to dentist.

OBJECTS CAUGHT BETWEEN THE TEETH
Try to remove the object with floss. Guide the floss carefully to avoid cutting the gums. If you are not successful in removing the object, go to the Dentist. Do not try to remove the object with are sharp or pointed object. Being prepared for a Dental Emergency is no accident. It takes a little time and thought, but by knowing what to do before an accident happens, you may someday save a tooth - yours or someone else's.

A tooth that causes ongoing pain may be a sign of a serious problem. Use this chart to communicate with us your Dental Pain

SYMPTOMS

DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE 1. Did you have an injury that knocked out a tooth? You have TOOTH LOSS DENTAL EMERGENCY
See your dentist or go to the emergency room right away. Keep the tooth moist. It's best to keep the tooth in your mouth until you get to the dentist or emergency room. The tooth may be saved. 2.Do you have pain that is specific to one tooth? Go to Question 5.* 3.Have you broken or chipped a tooth, or is the tooth loose in its socket? Your pain may be from a FRACTURED, CRACKED or LOOSE TOOTH. Save any pieces of the tooth, wrap them in a cool, moist cloth and see your dentist as soon as possible. 4. Do you feel pain when you eat cold foods or liquids? Your pain may be from a CAVITY. Make an appointment to see your dentist. Proper brushing and flossing along with fluoride rinses and coatings, as suggested by your dentist, may prevent tooth decay. *5. Do you have redness or swelling around one or more teeth, in your gums or in your face? You may have a dental ABSCESS or an INFECTION in a tooth, gums or other tissues. URGENT
See your dentist or doctor right away 6. Do you have redness and swelling in large areas of your gums, or is the skin inside your mouth peeling? You may have an infection such as TRENCH MOUTH, GINGIVITIS or PERIODONTITIS. A rare drug reaction, STEVENS-JOHNSON REACTION, may also cause this. See your dentist or doctor right away. You may be given antibiotics to stop the infection. Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen, may relieve discomfort. Many of these infections can be prevented with proper dental care, such as brushing and flossing regularly. 7. Do you have headaches, pain near your ear, headaches, or do you hear a cracking sound when you bite? Your pain may be from TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT (TMJ) syndrome, a condition that affects the jaw. Try relaxing your jaw when you are tense or nervous. Stop chewing gum. Try a mild anti-inflammatory medicine, such as ibuprofen. If you don't get better, see your dentist. For more information, please talk to your doctor or your dentist. If you think the problem is serious, call your doctor or your dentist right away.

This tool has been reviewed by doctors and is for general educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for medical advice. The information in this tool should not be relied upon to make decisions about your health. Always consult your dentist about your individual condition(s) and/or circumstances.

-back to top-

Common Sources of Dental Pain

The following observations are intended as general information for the public based on over one hundred thousand individual cases over thirty years. This is not intended to serve as a guide for self-diagnosis or as a substitute for an examination by a dentist.

Dental Decay
Dental decay is usually painless as it goes thru the enamel, the outer layer of the tooth.
The tooth can become "sensitive" as decay moves into the "live" dentin (inner layer) of the tooth.... sensitivity to sweet and sour as well as hot and cold is common but the tooth should not be continuously "sore" or "throb". As the decay process gets near the nerve of the tooth , the intensity and frequency of the symptoms usually increase.

Once the decay process has reached the nerve of the tooth, extreme pain can occur at any time...the intensity can range from moderate to a very severe...extreme throbbing pain can be continuous and can resist oral pain medication. This kind of pain could subside during the daylight hours but is typically much worse during the evening and night. Once a toothache wakes you from sleep it is often relentless.

Dental Abscess
By definition, a dental abscess is a localized collection of "pus"or infected material in the area surrounding the root end of the offending tooth...pressure built up in this area can cause severe pain that can be referred to other teeth as well as other areas of the mouth and face. Its not unusual for the patient not to know for sure where the pain is coming from or which tooth is the problem. This abscess can enlarge and extend to surrounding teeth...if the infection goes through the bone, rapid swelling of the gum and cheek can occur.

Cracked Tooth Syndrome
A very common problem with "root canal teeth" and teeth with large fillings .
Toothache due to a crack will start when you chew or put pressure on the tooth ... it will get worse as the crack continues to enlarge. ...the fractured piece may feel loose or actually fall off and an abscess can develop at any time. Its easy to visualize the mechanics of the problem - picture an ice cube or piece of glass with a crack.......every time you apply pressure or tap on top of the ice or glass, the crack will get bigger until the crack goes completely through. Pain from a cracked tooth can start as an occasional" twinge" or "zinger" or it can be sudden and severe and continuous from the very start.

P-Cor ( Pericoronitis )
This very common and painful condition is usually seen with a partly erupted wisdom tooth. Because there is not enough room for the tooth to come in completely, it becomes "stuck" or "wedged". A pocket or sack develops in the gum tissue around and behind this tooth. This pocket quickly fills with bacteria and food debris. Because the mouth is moist, warm and dark (it's a perfect incubator) an abscess can form rapidly. This pain can be very severe and continuous, and is commonly sent to (referred to) the area around the ear. Pain when opening or even severe limitation when trying to open the mouth in common. We often see patients coming from an ear doctor when their real problem was a wisdom tooth.

Wisdom Teeth
Wisdom teeth are the last molars to develop and usually start to erupt in the late teens. Because they are the very last teeth, they very commonly become impacted (stuck or wedged between jaw bone, gum and the adjacent tooth). Toothache or pain from the wisdom tooth area is one of the most common emergency problems that we see.

Over 90% of the population has "wisdom tooth" problems due to lack of room for proper eruption. Wisdom Tooth Problems encompass many issues including:

  • Pain Constant pressure in this sensitive area frequently causes neuralgia-like pain that can radiate to the ear, side of the face and upper teeth and spread to the other lower teeth as well. Headaches are commonly associated with impacted or partially erupted wisdom teeth.

  • Destruction of the Next Tooth -pressure from the wisdom teeth frequently erodes or dissolves away healthy tooth structure, resulting in pain and tooth loss

  • Cysts...fluid -filled sacks can form and enlarge around impacted wisdom teeth. These cysts can dissolve jawbone and teeth-they commonly become infected and cause serious pain

  • Crowding. Impacted wisdom teeth can quietly and painlessly push other teeth out of alignment and ruin years of orthodontic treatment. Cosmetic correction could require involved orthodontic work.

  • Infection-pericoronitis

Gum Abscess (Periodontal Abscess - Perio Abscess)
This infected tooth may be completely free from decay and have no filling...it may feel loose and the surrounding gum can feel swollen ....a bad taste is a common feature . A defect in the supporting bone along one or more sides of the tooth forms a "pocket" with the gum that becomes filled with food and bacterial debris....an abscess can develop "overnight". Mild sensitivity in the area can escalate to severe pain and swelling involving several teeth.

Overloaded/Over-stressed Tooth (Hyper Occlusion or Traumatic Occlusion)
Moderate to sharp discomfort to touch or pressure most commonly seen after placement of a dental filling or crown that is too "high".... can be easily corrected by adjusting the offending filling or crown and bite.

-back to top-

Several dental conditions have typical symptoms with different types of pain

A detailed history and examination will identify the cause of dentally-related pain in most emergency situations. Sharp, shooting pain can be caused by inflammation in the pulp or exposure of the dentine. Dull throbbing pain has several causes including ulcerative gingivitis, dental caries and food impaction. Simple treatment will usually alleviate the symptoms until patients can be seen by a dentist.


History and examination

  • location

  • type

  • frequency and duration

  • onset

  • exacerbation and remission (for example the response to heat or cold)

  • severity

  • area of radiation.

Associated pathology and referred pain should also be considered.

The following structures need to be examined carefully in order to be sure that the pain is of dental origin:

  • tongue

  • buccal mucosa

  • floor of the mouth

  • hard palate

  • teeth and periodontal tissues (see Fig. 1)

  • tonsils

  • temporomandibular joints

  • airway

  • ears

  • salivary glands

  • lymph nodes.


What are the common types of dental pain?

Short, sharp, shooting pain

This type of pain can be generalised or confined to one region of the mouth. The pain may be due to fluid movement through open tubules in the dentine or there may be some initial inflammatory changes in the dental pulp. It can be caused by caries, dentine exposure on root surfaces, split cusp, lost or fractured restoration or a fractured tooth.

Patients complain commonly of a sharp pain associated with hot, cold or sweet stimuli. The pain is only present when a stimulus is applied. In the case of a cracked cusp, grainy bread or hard food may create a sharp pain, that may be spasmodic, on biting or chewing.

With gingival recession, recent scaling, or tooth wear due to a high acid diet or gastric reflux, there may be generalised dentine sensitivity. However, with caries, fractured fillings and cracked cusps, the pain tends to be localised to the affected tooth.

Intermittent sharp, shooting pains are also symptomatic of trigeminal neuralgia, so care must be taken not to mistakenly label toothache as neuralgia.

Treatment
For root sensitivity the use of a desensitising toothpaste and a reduction in acid in the diet will help resolve the symptoms. The use of a fluoride mouth-rinse may also help. In the case of caries, a lost filling or fractured tooth, coverage of the exposed dentine with a temporary restoration will usually relieve the symptoms.

Causes of common types of dental pain

Dull, throbbing, persistent pain
This type of pain may have several causes. These include tooth problems, food impaction, pericoronitis, acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis, temporomandibular disorder, or even maxillary sinusitus.

Painful tooth problems

The most common dental cause of dull, throbbing persistent pain is caries. In many cases this is recurrent and associated with an existing restoration. Where the pulp is affected irreversibly, necrosis may follow with possible development of a periapical infection. A fractured cusp involving the pulp, or a large deep restoration may also be associated with this type of pain. Affected teeth may be tender to percussion in the later stages of periapical inflammation.

There is considerable variation in the pain reported by patients, but it commonly starts as a sharp stabbing pain that becomes progressively dull and throbbing. At first the pain may be caused by a stimulus, but it then becomes spontaneous and remains for a considerable time after removal of the stimulus. The pain may radiate and be referred to other areas of the mouth. This type of pain tends to cause the patient to have difficulty sleeping and may be exacerbated by lying down. Heat may make the pain worse whereas cold may alleviate it. The pain may be intermittent with no regular pattern and may have occurred over months or years. If there is periapical infection present, patients may no longer complain of pain in response to a thermal stimulus, but rather of sensitivity on biting.

Treatment

Treatment of affected teeth will involve either root canal therapy or tooth removal. In some patients, periapical inflammation can lead to a cellulitis of the face characterised by a rapid spread of bacteria and their breakdown products into the surrounding tissues causing extensive oedema and pain. If systemic signs of infection are present, for example, fever and malaise, as well as swelling and possibly trismus (limitation of mouth opening), this is a surgical emergency. Antibiotic treatment alone is not suitable or recommended.

Should antibiotics be prescribed?

While antibiotics are appropriate in the management of certain dental infections, they are not indicated if the pain results from inflammatory (non-infective) or neuropathic mechanisms. The degree of pain is not a reliable indicator of acute infection.

There is evidence that Australian dentists and doctors are using antibiotics empirically for dental pain, rather than making careful diagnoses of the causes of the pain.1 Most dental emergency situations involve patients with acute inflammation of the dental pulp or the periapical tissues. Prescribing antibiotics for these conditions will not remove the cause of the problem nor destroy the bacteria within the tooth.

Antibiotics should be limited to patients with malaise, fever, lymph node involvement, a suppressed or compromised immune system, cellulitis or a spreading infection, or a rapid onset of severe infection.

If pus is present, it needs to be drained, the cause eliminated, and host defences augmented with antibiotics. The microbial spectrum is mainly gram positive including anaerobes. Appropriate antibiotics would include a penicillin or a `first generation' cephalosporin, combined with metronidazole in more severe cases.

Paracetamol or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is the recommended analgesic in the initial treatment of dental pain.

Food impaction and pericoronitis

Soft tissue problems that may cause dull, throbbing, persistent pain include local inflammation (acute gingivitis associated with food impaction) or pericoronitis.

Chronic periodontitis with gradual bone loss, rarely causes pain and patients may be unaware of the disorder until tooth mobility is evident. There is quite often bleeding from the gums and sometimes an unpleasant taste. This is usually a generalised condition, however, deep pocketing with extreme bone loss can occur around isolated teeth. Food impaction in these areas can cause localised gingival pain. Poor contact between adjacent teeth and the presence of an occluding cusp forcing food into this gap can also cause a build-up of food debris and result in gingival inflammation.

Acute pericoronitis involves bacterial infection around an unerupted or partially erupted tooth and usually affects the lower third molar (wisdom tooth). The condition is often aggravated by the upper molar impacting on the swollen flap of soft tissue covering the unerupted tooth. There may be trismus.

Treatment
Food debris should be removed and drainage established, if pus is present. Irrigation with chlorhexidine and rinsing the mouth with hot salty water is recommended. Early referral to a dentist is indicated. Cellulitis can develop, requiring urgent referral to a surgeon.

Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis

Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis is a rapidly progressive infection of the gingival tissues that causes ulceration of the interdental gingival papillae. It can lead to extensive destruction. Usually young to middle-aged people with reduced resistance to infection are affected. Males are more likely to be affected than females, with stress, smoking and poor oral hygiene being predisposing factors. Halitosis, spontaneous gingival bleeding, and a `punched-out' appearance of the interdental papillae are all important signs.

The patients quite often complain of severe gingival tenderness with pain on eating and tooth brushing. The pain is dull, deep-seated and constant. The gums can bleed spontaneously and there is also an unpleasant taste in the mouth.

Treatment
As there is an acute infection with mainly anaerobic bacteria, treatment follows surgical principles and includes superficial debridement, use of chlorhexidine mouthwashes and a course of metronidazole tablets. Treating the contributing factors should prevent a recurrence.

Dry socket
A dull throbbing pain develops two to four days after a mandibular tooth extraction. It rarely occurs in the maxilla. Smoking is a major predisposing factor as it reduces the blood supply. The tissue around the socket is very tender and white necrotic bone is exposed in the socket. Halitosis is very common.

Treatment
The area should be irrigated thoroughly with warm saline solution. If loose bone is present, local anaesthesia may be necessary to allow thorough cleaning of the socket. Patients should be shown how to irrigate the area and told to do this regularly. Analgesics are indicated, but pain may persist for several days. Although opinion is divided as to whether or not dry socket is an infective condition, we do not recommend the use of antibiotics in its management.


Sinusitis
This is caused by infection of the maxillary sinus, usually following an upper respiratory tract infection. However, there can be a history of recent tooth extraction leading to an oro-antral fistula. Patients usually complain of unilateral dull pain in all posterior upper teeth. All these teeth may be tender to percussion, but they will respond to a pulp sensitivity test. There are usually no other dental signs.

The pain tends to be increased on lying down or bending over. There is often a feeling of `fullness' on the affected side. The pain is usually unilateral, dull, throbbing and continuous. Quite often the patient feels unwell generally and feverish.

Treatment
Pain originating from the sinus arises mainly from pressure. Decongestants can help sinus drainage. Antibiotics probably have only a minor role in mild cases. Referral to an otorhinolaryngologist for endoscopic sinus surgery may be indicated in chronic cases.

-back to top-

Managing dental trauma

Avulsed tooth
Avulsed deciduous (baby) teeth are generally not reimplanted, as they may become fused to the alveolar bone and impede subsequent emergence of the permanent successor.

It is essential to reimplant permanent teeth as soon as possible. However, while the tooth is out of the alveolus it should be stored in a physiological medium, for example, normal saline, milk, or the vestibule of the mouth.

Before reimplantation, the root surface should be cleaned gently with normal saline to remove debris, but the root should not be touched with the fingers. The tooth socket should be irrigated gently with normal saline to remove any blood clot that has formed. The tooth should then be replaced into the socket using minimal pressure, and splinted to the adjacent teeth with a flexible splint (e.g. aluminium foil, bluetack).

When a tooth is reimplanted, an antibiotic is prescribed for five days and a tetanus booster is given if immunisation is not up to date.

Fractured tooth
If the crown of a tooth is fractured by trauma and the broken fragment is available, it should be stored in a physiological medium until a dentist can assess the patient. Coverage of exposed dentine on the fractured crown with a temporary restoration is desirable to protect the underlying pulp tissue.

Placement of temporary restorations
Although it is unlikely that many general medical practitioners will have temporary filling materials available in their surgeries, dentine that has been exposed by caries, a lost filling or tooth fracture can be covered relatively easily with glass ionomer cement (GIC) or zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) materials. Most GIC materials are dispensed in capsules but a hand-mixed material is available, consisting of a powder, liquid and conditioner. The surface of the cavity is painted with the conditioner, then rinsed and dried, before placement of the filling. Zinc oxide eugenol materials consist of a powder and liquid (oil of cloves) that are mixed to a putty-like consistency before placement in the tooth.

Cavities are the most common reason for tooth ache. They are caused by dental plaque, a sticky substance made up of food bits saliva and bacteria. Plaque makes acids that eat away the enamel on the teeth. A Tooth ache can also be caused by a bit of food stuck between the gum and the teeth. Tooth pain can also be caused when the nerve root of a tooth is irritated. Dental infection, decay, injury, or loss of a tooth is a few common causes of dental pain. Pain may also occur after a tooth is pulled out. Pain sometimes originates from other areas and radiates to the jaw, thus appearing to be tooth pain.

Symptoms

  • Sharp pain in the tooth, often when you bite or chew.

  • Ache or soreness in the teeth, gums or jaws.

  • Bad breath or bad taste in your mouth due to severe decay.

  • A loose tooth.

  • Red, swollen or bleeding gums.

  • Fever.

  • Earache.

  • Swollen glands in the neck.

  • Severe pain in the jaw.

Prevention

  • Brush your teeth after meals and between-meal snacks. Floss at least once a day.

  • Avoid foods that contain a lot of sugar. Sugar helps plaque grow.

  • Do not smoke or use other tobacco products because it decreases your ability to fight gum infection and delays healing.

  • Don't eat any sticky foods, which damage tooth enamel.

  • Get your teeth cleaned every 6 months and see a dentist every year.

  • Ask your dentist or hygienist whether he or she recommends using a mouthwash that contains fluoride and ingredients to reduce plaque.

Scared of Going to the Dentist? The Feel Good Guide to going to the Dentist

Nothing personal Doc - 'I Hate Dentists' - The Feel Good Guide to Going to Dentist.

If, like most people, you experience some degree of anxiety when it comes time to see your dentist, the following suggestions can help you to relax before and during dental treatment. What's important is to recognise your anxiety, accept it as a common reaction to an uncertain situation and learn to master it.

1. Start by sharing your feelings with your dentist and dental hygienist. Let them know that you are fearful, tense, or anxious so that they can tailor their treatment and their pace to your needs. Often, a pain reliever can be given if it's pain you fear.

2. Set aside a stress-free time for your dental visit - a time when you won't be rushed, physically strained, or troubled by other concerns.

3. Being friendly and sociable helps establish trust and warmth, both of which can do wonders in allaying your fears and in reducing tension. You might also have a close friend or family member accompany you to your appointment to make you more at ease.

4. Try to identify your specific fears and concerns. While these fears are very understandable, it is important to recognise that they often are not realistic given the modern, pain-free techniques now used in dentistry.

5. Get a good night's sleep the day before and eat a light breakfast the day of your appointment. To allow unconstrained movement, wear loose, comfortable clothes. Especially avoid wearing constricting necklines, such as tight collars.

6. Schedule short dental appointments by having different procedures performed on different days, if possible. Also arrange to break from lengthy procedures now and then.

7. Use visualisation to feel more comfortable and relaxed both before and during a dental visit. You can focus on a relaxing scene from a favourite vacation spot or activity and hold it before your "mind's eye" during treatment.

8. During the dental visit, practise distraction and relaxation techniques to take your mind off the treatment and to reduce tension. You might focus, for instance, on such pleasant distractions as soft music or a colorful poster.

9. Ask the dentist or hygienist to explain each step of the dental examination or procedure. The more you know about the reasons for a certain procedure and what will be done during it, the more confident and relaxed you'll be.

10. Once the dental visit is over, praise yourself for a job well done! You might also treat yourself to a special reward for overcoming your dental anxiety.

-back to top-

10 Tips to Help You Overcome Dentist Phobia


1. Tell the dentist about your fears. This information will help the dentist determine how to best manage and address those fears. By letting the dentist know exactly why the experience is difficult for you, you will feel more control in the examination chair.

2. Remember that dental procedures have greatly improved in the past few years. Modern dentistry offers new methods and treatment options to make you feel comfortable.

3. Your dentist can explain the entire procedure to you beforehand, as well as walk you through step-by-step while the procedure is being performed. You always have the right to fully understand the work being done on your teeth.

4. Consider additional medication to relax. Many dentists recommend nitrous oxide, sedation or anti-anxiety medicine for extremely nervous patients. Find a dentist who offers these options to help you get through the visit.

5. Find a dentist you are comfortable with and establish a trusting relationship. There are many personalities in the dental profession. Find a dentist who makes you feel at ease and is willing to work with you on your fears.

6. Breathe deeply and try to relax. Some dentists recommend practicing relaxation techniques before and during the appointment. Other dentists find that listening to music, or scheduling an appointment first thing in the morning, before the stresses of the day add up, also help patients to relax.

7. Talk to the dentist about stopping if you're uncomfortable. Many of the dentists surveyed said they establish a signal to "stop" with their patients. This puts you in control of the procedure and alerts the dentist if you're uncomfortable or need to take a break during the appointment.

8. Visit the dentist regularly to prevent problems. For fearful patients, just going for a check up can be nerve-wracking, but the more you go to the dentist for routine cleanings, the more likely you are to avoid larger problems that result in extensive procedures.

9. Visit the office and talk to the staff before your first appointment. You should feel free to meet with the dentist and to ask questions before scheduling your appointment. Meeting the dentist and his or her staff first will help you find a dentist you like and trust.

10. Go slow. Dentists are happy to go slow with nervous patients. If possible, make sure your first visit is a simple one, such as a cleaning. This will help you build your relationship with the dentist before going in for a more difficult procedure.

TREATMENT METHODS OF OVERCOMING DENTAL PHOBIA

If you are anxious about dental treatment then you are not alone. Between 6-14% of the population avoid attending the dentist because of anxiety about treatment. Between 45-55% of patients who attended the dentist are anxious in the dental environment.
The reasons people fear attending the dentist are varied and include pain, cost of treatment, lack of control while in the dental chair, embarrassment and fear of the unknown. The cause of dental anxiety is usually a previous bad experience, but can be caused indirectly through horror stories about dental treatment from family, friends and even the media.

The fear of treatment may appear to the patient to be irrational, uncontrollable and without obvious cause. Such patients will only attend for treatment when in extreme discomfort or never at all. As a result their dental condition deteriorates to the point where their appearance is affected. This can cause embarrassment and loss of self-confidence which in turn can cause problems socially and at work.

For other patients, the fear is not so deep seated. They can explain the cause of their anxiety and can usually control it to some extent. However, they are still anxious about dental treatment and will try and avoid it where possible.
Fear of dental treatment can be overcome by a variety of treatment methods which are described on this website.

When you make the appointment to see the dentist, tell the receptionist you are nervous about treatment. This first appointment will usually be to discuss your fears about treatment and to do an initial examination of your teeth. From this appointment a provisional treatment plan can be made. Depending on what you and the dentist decide, this plan can include one or more of the the treatment methods outlined below.Initially, you may wish to have treatment using one or more of these described methods. However, the ultimate aim should be to reduce your anxiety to a level that it is possible to have treatment without any assistance. This is not possible in all cases, but where it can be achieved it is very satisfying for both patient and dentist.


There are several methods available to help you overcome your fears while dental treatment is being done.

These are:

BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT
This is the simplest method of treatment for nervous patients. It involves a careful and sympathetic approach from the dentist, with explanations of what is being done and allowing the patient control over the procedure.

Some patients may want to bring a friend along for support. It may also be possible to play relaxing music or to watch a video while having treatment.

ORAL SEDATION
This involves the use of oral sedative drugs e.g. diazepam, midazolam, which are taken before treatment. They can also be taken the night before treatment to help you sleep.

The sedative effect of these drugs is unpredictable and can vary between individuals. Because the drugs are taken by mouth it is impossible to quickly increase or decrease the amount sedation.

They are best used for sedation the night before treatment to ensure restful sleep or to produce light sedation during treatment where anxiety levels are low.

While under the effects of the drug, the patient must be accompanied by a responsible adult and refrain from driving and operating machinery.

INTRAVENOUS SEDATION
This involves administering a sedative drug in order to produce a very relaxed state so that treatment can be carried out. The drug also causes short term memory loss so that very little of the treatment can be remembered.

The drug is administered through one of the veins in the arm or hand. The amount of drug given varies between individuals but enough is injected to produce relaxed state within five minutes. Because the drug acts very quickly, more can be given if necessary to increase the feeling of relaxation.

The effects of the drug can last up eight hours after and the patient must be accompanied by a responsible adult and refrain from driving, operating machinery or other responsible activities during this time.

It can be used on most healthy adults but must be avoided in patients with severe lung disease, some heart problems, obesity or in pregnancy. It is also not suitable for children or the elderly.

This type of sedation is very safe as the patient is not unconscious as in general anaesthesia. It works for the vast majority of patients and it is a very effective way of providing dental treatment. It is also very effective in treating patients who gag easily.

INHALATION SEDATION
This involves giving a mixture of nitrous oxide ('laughing gas') and oxygen which are inhaled through a rubber face mask. The nitrous oxide reduces anxiety and improves co-operation, without causing unconsciousness.

The effects of the nitrous oxide wears off very quickly and the patient can leave the surgery without the need for an accompanying adult.

This technique can used for most patients but must be avoided in those with colds and other respiratory problems, psychiatric treatment, vitamin B12 deficiency and in pregnancy. This form of sedation is particularly useful for treating anxious children.

GENERAL ANAESTHESIA
General anaesthesia (GA) involves being 'put to sleep' in order to provide dental treatment. It is only available in hospitals and specialist centres, and must be administered by a qualified anaesthetist. Because of the slight risks involved with GA, it is only used where there is no other option. The procedure is usually limited to adults who are undergoing complex treatments (e.g. extraction of wisdom teeth) or are not suitable for the other methods of treatment described. It is also used to treat anxious children. Treatment provided under GA is usually limited to extractions and simple fillings.

HYPNOSIS
This involves the use of hypnotherapy to reduce anxiety.

It is very effective in people who are respond well to hypnosis. It may involve one or more preliminary sessions before treatment is attempted. The hypnosis may be done by a hypnotist working with a dentist or by the dentist if he is qualified in hypnotherapy.

This type of treatment is not widely available and can be time consuming and expensive.

PSYCHOTHERAPY
This form of treatment is used to treat a whole range of phobias and anxiety disorders. The psychotherapist will initially try and locate the origin of your fears. They will then follow a program of therapy designed to overcome or control your anxiety sufficiently for you to undergo dental treatment.

ACUPUNCTURE
Acupuncture is a medical treatment which can be used to relieve the symptoms of a variety of physical and psychological conditions including dental anxiety. Each patient's case is assessed by the practitioner and treatment will be tailored to the individual.

A Simple 5 Minute Cure for Dental Anxiety

Many of us feel extremely anxious when we think of visiting the dentist. This fear is the cause of procrastination in scheduling dental appointments, missed or cancelled appointments, and difficulty in tolerating procedures during dental care.

Although many dentists will try to convince you that these fears are unfounded, we believe that there are actually many good reasons (even aside from painful past dental experiences) to feel anxious about visiting the dentist. By understanding these reasons and utilizing our simple techniques, dental anxiety can become a thing of the past!

The oral cavity is one of the most tender and most vulnerable parts of our body. We feed ourselves through it and kiss our loved ones with it--the mouth is literally a path to our innermost self. The tongue is the only organ in our body which is fully developed at birth and functions fully during the first 2 months of life. Our infant lives are dependent upon it for nourishment, to communicate and express our feelings, and to explore the world (We all know how infants just seem to put everything they touch into their mouths!). During this early part of our lives, we are helpless and dependent, unable to express ourselves fully, and vulnerable to pain outside of our control.

Does this describe the feelings aroused by a dental visit?!

During dental care, we place our mouths in a very vulnerable position. If we feel helpless, these infant experiences of dependency and vulnerability will arise from our unconscious minds. The result: anxiety.

A visit to the dentist is unlike any other medical experience. We place ourselves in a physically vulnerable position (on our backs), and suspend our usual physical boundaries by allowing the dentist to "invade" our bodies. We render ourselves unable to communicate in the usual way (since our mouths are what's being tended to), and anticipate pain, while remaining conscious and fully alert. The physical proximity of the dentist may be perceived as threatening, and if we add to the mix the negative associations many of us have with doctors or other authority figures, it is easy to see how feelings of anxiety might arise.

Most of us agree that anxiety and fear notwithstanding, the benefits of timely dental visits far outweigh the cost of avoiding them. How then, do we cope with the anxiety we feel when faced with a dental appointment?

Eliminating Acute Anxiety

This exercise is intended to give you control over the physical discomfort of anxiety.

1. Before your dental appointment, imagine yourself in the anxiety producing situation

In order to eliminate anxiety, one must first recognize the feeling of being anxious.

Sit in a chair in a quiet place and picture yourself in a stressful situation, dental or non-dental. For example, a stressful dental situation might be either anticipating a dreaded dental experience or remembering a past dental experience. A non-dental example might be speaking in front of a large group of people.

At first, try standing "outside" of yourself and watch yourself in the difficult situation. Then try to experience the situation yourself, looking at it from the "inside".

Once you feel anxious, or physical discomfort, go on to #2.

2. Locate where in your body the anxiety 'lives,' such as a tense neck or back, clenched fists, nervous stomach, unconsciously holding your breath, or dizziness. Close your eyes. Pretend to travel inside of your body and find the place where the stress seems to "live". This is often the stomach, chest, head, hands or arms. This area feels different and separate from the rest of your body.

3. Measure the anxiety on a 1-10 scale. Rate the degree of discomfort on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the worst. This will allow you to monitor your progress.

4. This step is important: Explore the "size, shape, borders and texture" of the anxiety.

The area of discomfort feels different and separate from the rest of your body. Try to isolate it and explore its "borders" and "shape". Is it "large" or "small"? "Round" or "square"? Localized or diffuse? How deep does it go? All the way to your back? Or is it shallow and just under the surface? Is it a solid, liquid or gas?

5. Manipulate the anxiety: make it larger, smaller, softer, etc.

Now that you have a clear idea of the stress you're feeling, you can do things to change it. First, make it bigger. Take all the concentration you need to do this, and when you're ready, rate it on a scale of 1-10. (It will probably be less than 10.) Then, make the area smaller, like a golf ball or an egg. Now, you can move it around, forward and back, or side to side. As you begin to gain control of the anxiety, you can begin opening a path from where the anxiety "lives" to your throat. Now, move the spot of discomfort to your throat, then take a deep breath and blow it out of your mouth.

6. Re-measure the anxiety. Do your 1-10 rating. By now, it will probably feel much less!


These steps give you some control over your anxiety, which enables you to reduce it.

What if these tactics to overcome the fear of visiting a dentist don't work?

In some cases a step-by-step desensitization program can eliminate severe fear of the dentist. Another option is medication to help you relax for your appointments. Discuss this possibility with your dentist.

"Your relationship with your dentist is based on trust, and you should expect to be treated as an individual. Make requests. Don't hesitate to ask for special treatment.

-back to top-

Treating Children Who Fear the Dentist


Some children have a deep-seated fear of dentists, making dental appointments a traumatizing experience. However, it is important that children have regular dental checkups. There are tips for dealing with children who have dental anxiety or severe dental phobia, including:

  • Start dental checkups at an early age, so the child will be comfortable and familiar with dental appointments.

  • Enforce good oral hygiene, so trips to the dentist are minimal.

  • Be careful not to convey your fears of the dentist to your child.

Another option to treat a child's dental anxiety is to find a dentist who specializes in pediatric care. Pediatric dentists have special training that allows them to help anxious children feel safe and secure during dental checkups and procedures. They also offer kid-friendly offices, so the environment is inviting and comfortable for children.

If not addressed during younger years, dental anxiety can develop into severe dental phobia as one gets older. To prevent bad oral hygiene later in life, the above suggestions can work to calm your child's fear of dentists.

Keywords

dentist melbourne, cosmetic dentistry melbourne, porcelain veneer melbourne, teeth whitening melbourne

Payment Options

  • Cash
  • Visa
  • Mastercard
  • Financing Arranged